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I am working on a patch for an existing bug in error handling in the standard library's shutil.rmtree() and I encountered this code:

try:
    orig_st = os.lstat(path)
except Exception:
    onerror(os.lstat, path, sys.exc_info())
    return
try:
    fd = os.open(path, os.O_RDONLY)
except Exception:
    onerror(os.lstat, path, sys.exc_info())
    return

I would like to simplify it to the following before applying my changes to ease implementation:

try:
    orig_st = os.lstat(path)
    fd = os.open(path, os.O_RDONLY)
except Exception:
    onerror(os.lstat, path, sys.exc_info())
    return

Is there any case in which behavior would be different between the two code samples?

share|improve this question
2  
Don't catch Exception. Catch specific exceptions instead. – Martijn Pieters Mar 18 '13 at 19:42
    
@MartijnPieters I know that's best practice, but unfortunately I cannot break backwards compatibility in the shutils.rmtree API and therefore I must maintain the current handling of onerror until the feature is deprecated and removed. (The messiness and complexity of the onerror system is in fact what we're trying to fix with this patch, but it will be a multistep process.) – Andrew Gorcester Mar 18 '13 at 19:47
up vote 4 down vote accepted

No

there is no case in a single threaded application where the two are different. In a multithreaded application the "path" could change between the two try excepts, though.

This code was introduced in a patch fixing a symlink attack vulnerability (http://bugs.python.org/issue4489). Maybe you should ask the original committer for a code review after your changes. According to http://hg.python.org/cpython/annotate/c910af2e3c98/Lib/shutil.py#434 , it is Hynek Schlawack .

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I am at the PyCon sprint right now, and either the bug author is actually here, or I can consult another core dev about the best course of action. – Andrew Gorcester Mar 18 '13 at 20:43

I think the two cases are identical, but only because there is a return inside each of the exception blocks, meaning that the second try...except block doesn't actually get executed if an exception is encountered in the first.

If the first try...except didn't return, then the second try...except block would be executed even if an exception was encountered in the first block, and the two cases would not be identical.

share|improve this answer

I think the reason they have it split, is because if it catches Exception on the first try, then it will then still do set a value to fd. The way you have it written, if the Exception is caught on the first bit of code (i.e. orig_st) then it will never set fd because it will already have passed it, even though it may not contain the Exception.

share|improve this answer
    
But the return in the exception block would prevent the second block from happening anyway. I think the two cases are equivalent so long as each block returns on exception. – Nisan.H Mar 18 '13 at 20:02
    
oops, didn't see the returns. – NightHallow Mar 18 '13 at 22:12

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