Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

As the title says, what exactly is the difference between

public static String myString = "Hello World!";

and

public static String myString;

static {
    myString = "Hello World";
}

is there any important difference other than the structure ?

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

For your example, there is no difference. But as you can see,

public static String myString = "Hello World!";

can only accept an expression to initialize the variable. However, in a static initializer (JLS 8.7), any number of statements may be executed. E.g. it's possible to do this:

static
{
    myString = "Hello";
    myString += " ";
    myString += "World";
}

For your example, there's obviously no need to do that, but it's possible for the initialization of a variable to take more than an expression, perhaps many statements, so Java made static initializers.

share|improve this answer

Well, in your first example the variable is declared and initialized on the same line. In your second the variable is first declared, then initialized. In the second case you could have any number of other static variable and block initializations occur before getting to the initialization block in question. Consider this case:

public static String myString = "Hello World!";
public static String yourString = myString;
static {
    System.out.println(myString);
    System.out.println(yourString);
}

vs:

public static String myString ;
public static String yourString = myString;

static {
    myString = "Hello World";
}

static {
    System.out.println(myString);
    System.out.println(yourString);
}

Output from the first example:

Hello World
Hello World

Output from the second example:

Hello World
null
share|improve this answer

The static {...} block gives you the opportunity to do more than you would be able to do in the field declaration.

For example, you can fill in some details of a map:

private static final Map<String, String> data = new HashMap<String, String>();

static {
    data.put("A", "Hello");
    data.put("B", "There");
    data.put("C", "You");
}

Sometimes you may also need to get data (from a file, database, etc) before you can instantiate:

public class Foo {
    private static final Person person;

    static {
        InputStream personData = Foo.class.getResourceAsStream("something.txt");
        person = new Person(personData);
    }
    ...
}
share|improve this answer

To continue with what Scott Stanchfield wrote, you can use the Collections.unmodifiableXXX() methods for safety, though libraries like Google Guava may make that less necessary. Consider:

public static final Map<String, String> CAPITALS;
static {
    Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<>(); //Java 7.
    map.put("NY", "Albany");
    map.put("MD", "Annapolis");
    map.put("VA", "Richmond");
    map.put("CT", "Hartford");
    // 46 more states
    CAPITALS = Collections.unmodifiableMap(map);
}

Of course, having a 52-line static block may be disorienting, and so you might instead take the static block and turn it into a static method.

public static final Map<String, String> CAPITALS = capitals();
private static Map<String, String> capitals() {
    Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<>(); //Java 7.
    map.put("NY", "Albany");
    map.put("MD", "Annapolis");
    map.put("VA", "Richmond");
    map.put("CT", "Hartford");
    // 46 more states
    return Collections.unmodifiableMap(map);
}

The difference is a matter of style. You might instead just work with a database table.

share|improve this answer

with static blocks you can change the order of the initialisation different to the order of declaration.

share|improve this answer

A static variable stores a value that is shared between all instances (or the non-instance) of the Class it is defined in.

A static block is a section of code that gets executed when Class is first loaded.

"regarding scope, static block is accssible only in the same class"," whereas static variable can be accessed from any class"

share|improve this answer

Generally a static variable's value is shared between all instances (or the non-instance) of the Class it is defined in where a static block is a section of code that gets executed when Class is first loaded. Functionally There is no difference.

share|improve this answer

Difference between static initializer block and regular static initialization.

In case of variable initialization both are same.

But If we want to connect with database only once or any operation you want to load once. Then write the code in static block because its execute only once when first class load no matter how many objects of that type you create.

EDIT :

You can also construct a similar block:

{
    // Do Something...
}

Example:

public class Demo {

    static{
        System.out.println("Static");
    }

    {
        System.out.println("Non-static block");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Demo demo = new Demo();
        Demo demo2 = new Demo();
    }
}

Output:

Static

Non-static block

Non-static block

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.