Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi I have a array as myarray. I would like to make a list as '1 2 3' which is joining the first subarray. My string is printing the memory location I suppose instead of list. any help will be appreciated.

@myarray = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]];
for (my $i=0; $i < @myarray; $i++) {
my @firstarray = $myarray[$i];
my $mystring = join("", @firstarray);
print "My string ".$mystring . ". "\n";
}
share|improve this question
    
Learn about Perl references and dereferencing. Contrary to popular belief, they're almost totally unlike C-style pointers, and you are doing some strange things with them in your example. The following Perl tutorial gives the most concise treatment of the subject I know: qntm.org/files/perl/perl.html –  Zac B Mar 18 '13 at 21:19
    
use warnings; -- that would have alerted you to your strange initialization for @myarray –  mob Mar 18 '13 at 22:12
1  
for references I prefer the core document perldoc perlreftut. It makes references much more understandable. –  Joel Berger Mar 18 '13 at 23:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to dereference the inner array reference by @{ ... }. Also, do not use [...] for the top structure - use normal parentheses (square brackets create an array reference, not an array). There was also a problem with the concatenation on your print line:

@myarray = ( [1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9] );
for (my $i=0; $i < @myarray; $i++) {
    my @firstarray = @{ $myarray[$i] };
    my $mystring = join("", @firstarray);
    print "My string " . $mystring . ".\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Useless copy of the array! Hard to read C-style loop! –  ikegami Mar 18 '13 at 22:11
    
@ikegami: I just tried to stay as close as possible to the original code. –  choroba Mar 18 '13 at 22:15

You should use the Data::Dumper module, that way, that will help you to know how to parse your data structure :

print Dumper \@myarray; # force passing array as ref
$VAR1 = [
          [
            [
              1,
              2,
              3
            ],
            [
              4,
              5,
              6
            ],
            [
              7,
              8,
              9
            ]
          ]
        ];

But using the @ sigil (array) to store an ARRAY ref is strange, a $ sigil (scalar) is used most of the times for that purpose. (a reference is like a C pointer : an address to a memory cell. So its' a simple string, no need something else than a scalar to store it)

Then, you need to de-reference with the -> operator.

Ex :

$ perlconsole
Perl Console 0.4

Perl> my $arrayref = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]];

Perl> print join "\n", @{ $arrayref->[2] }
7
8
9
share|improve this answer

You actually have an array of array of array.

  • The outer array has one element, a reference to an array.
    $myarray[0]
  • That referenced array has three elements, each a reference to an array.
    $myarray[0][0..2]
  • Each of those referenced arrays have three elements, three numbers.
    $myarray[0][0..2][0..2]

You want

my @aoa = ([1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]);
   ^       ^       ^       ^
   |        \------+------/
   |            3 inner
1 outer

$aoa[$i][$j]

for my $inner (@aoa) {
   print(join(', ', @$inner), "\n");
}

or

my $aoa = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]];
          ^^       ^       ^
          | \------+------/
          |      3 inner
       1 outer

$aoa->[$i][$j]

for my $inner (@$aoa) {
   print(join(', ', @$inner), "\n");
}
share|improve this answer
    
why is it an "array of array of array"? i see an outer array or three inner single-dimensional arrays –  amphibient Mar 18 '13 at 21:11
    
@amphibient, Because you have 3 arrays referenced by elements of one array referenced by elements of one array. That's 5 arrays, not 4. As I showed, count the my @ and the []. Remember that [...] is basically do { my @a = (...); \@a }. –  ikegami Mar 18 '13 at 21:26
    
but if you have 3 inner and one outer, that is 4 arrays, no? besides, i would just look at it as a simple AoA [3][3] –  amphibient Mar 18 '13 at 21:27
    
@amphibient, Yes, if you had 3 inner and one outer, that would be 4. Since he has 5 (one created with my and 4 created with []), he doesn't have 3 inner and one outer. This can also bee seen with Dumper(\@myarray). –  ikegami Mar 18 '13 at 21:32
    
ah, OK -- so you are saying that, the way he declares it, he has 5, whereas he is supposed to correctly have 4 –  amphibient Mar 18 '13 at 21:34

You need to change how you initialize your array so that () is used for the outer array bounds and [] for the inner arrays, which means that they are declared as references that will later need to be cast into their native array format for processing (my @subarray = @{$myarray[$i]};)

my @myarray = ([1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9]);

for (my $i=0; $i < @myarray; $i++) 
{
    my @subarray = @{$myarray[$i]};
    my $subarrayStr = join("", @subarray);
    print $i.". Subarray Str = ".$subarrayStr."\n";
}
share|improve this answer
$myarray = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]];
printf "My string %s\n", join(" ", @{$myarray->[0]});

[[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]] returns a reference to the list of lists, not a list.

Change the @ into $ , to make $myarray a variable.

@{$myarray->[0]} will dereference the first sublist and return you the list you can use.

To print all three lists:

$myarray = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]];
map{printf "My string %s\n", join(" ",@{$_})} @{$myarray};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.