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I'm trying to figure out how to solve one of the problems from one of the ACM ICPC finals (from 2012, so I guess the most recent). It's called Fibonacci Words and is described here under Problem D.

I think I'm very close, as all the test cases except the last are giving the correct answer. But for the last, I'm getting 6440026026380244497, which is on the right order of magnitude but still way off--since the order of magnitude is huge. :)

Here's my Java code, with a lot of comments (too many, you think? could it be refactored?):

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;

public class FibonacciWords {

public static StringBuilder[] updateChars(StringBuilder lastOneBack, StringBuilder firstTwoBack, StringBuilder lastTwoBack, StringBuilder firstThreeBack) {
    int pattLen = lastOneBack.length();
    StringBuilder[] newChars = new StringBuilder[2];
    newChars[0] = new StringBuilder(pattLen); // will become the new lastOneBack!
    newChars[1] = new StringBuilder(pattLen); // will become the new firstTwoBack!

    if(lastOneBack.charAt(0) == 'E') { // lastOneBack not full yet
        int shiftCharsBy = 0; // holds amount to shift lastOneBack by
        for(int i = 0; i < pattLen; i++) {
            if(firstTwoBack.charAt(i) != 'E') {
                shiftCharsBy++; // need to move whatever is at beginning of firstTwoBack to end of lastOneBack
            } else {
                break; // when first 'E' is reached in firstTwoBack, the rest are 'E' also
            }
        }

        for(int i = 0; i < pattLen-shiftCharsBy; i++) {
            newChars[0].append(lastOneBack.charAt(i+shiftCharsBy)); // shift lastOneBack by shiftCharsBy characters
        }
        for(int i = 0; i < shiftCharsBy; i++) {
            newChars[0].append(firstTwoBack.charAt(i)); // fill remainder of new lastOneBack with what's in firstTwoBack
        }
    } else { // lastOneBack already full
        newChars[0] = lastTwoBack; // make lastOneBack lastTwoBack (following pattern)
    }

    if(firstTwoBack.charAt(pattLen-1) == 'E') { // firstTwoBack not full yet
        if(lastOneBack.charAt(0) == 'E') {
            for(int i = 1; i < pattLen; i++) {
                if(lastOneBack.charAt(i) != 'E') {
                    newChars[1].append(lastOneBack.substring(i)); // move last characters of lastOneBack to front of new firstTwoBack
                    break;
                }
            }
            int charsAdded = newChars[1].length();
            for(int i = 0; i < pattLen-charsAdded; i++) {
                newChars[1].append('E'); // fill whatever might remain with 'E'
            }
        } else {
            //newChars[1] = lastOneBack;
            for(int i = 0; i < pattLen; i++) {
                if(firstTwoBack.charAt(i) != 'E') {
                    newChars[1].append(firstTwoBack.charAt(i));
                } else {
                    break;
                }
            }
            int charsAdded = newChars[1].length();
            // now take from firstThreeBack--which also isn't full if firstTwoBack isn't--until pattLen is reached
            for(int i = 0; i < pattLen-charsAdded; i++) {
                newChars[1].append(firstThreeBack.charAt(i));
            }
        }
    } else {
        newChars[1] = firstTwoBack; // firstTwoBack doesn't change when already full
    }

    return newChars;
}

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
    int n = Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());
    String pattern = br.readLine();

    long numPattTwoPrior = 0; // number of times pattern occurred in F(n-2)
    if(pattern.equals("0")) {
        numPattTwoPrior++; // since n starts at 2 below, increment this if pattern is F(0), or "0"
    }

    long numPattOnePrior = 0; // number of times pattern occurred in F(n-1)
    if(pattern.equals("1")) {
        numPattOnePrior++; // since n starts at 2 below, increment this if pattern is F(1), or "1"
    }

    int pattLen = pattern.length();
    StringBuilder lastCharsInOnePrior = new StringBuilder(pattLen); // keeps track of last pattLen characters in F(n-1)
    for(int i = 0; i < pattLen; i++) {
        lastCharsInOnePrior.append('E'); // 'E' stands for empty
    }
    lastCharsInOnePrior.setCharAt(pattLen-1, '1'); // since F(1) = "1"

    StringBuilder firstCharsInTwoPrior = new StringBuilder(pattLen);
    for(int i = 0; i < pattLen; i++) {
        firstCharsInTwoPrior.append('E');
    }
    firstCharsInTwoPrior.setCharAt(0, '0'); // since F(0) = "0"

    StringBuilder lastCharsInTwoPrior = null; // last characters always the same as 2 back, so keep track of this
    StringBuilder firstCharsInThreePrior = null; // used for special case in updateChars
    // number of times pattern occurs in F(n)
    long numPattCurr = (n == 0) ? numPattTwoPrior : (n == 1) ? numPattOnePrior : 0;

    for(int i = 2; i <= n; i++) { // finding F(n) up to the n given by the input
        numPattCurr = numPattTwoPrior + numPattOnePrior; // at least this many times in F(n)

        // adding to above all patterns found as part of concatenating F(n-1) and F(n-2), but not either on its own
        middle:
        for(int j = 1; j < pattLen; j++) { // starting at pos. 1 b/c [0, pattLen) is all F(n-1)
            if(lastCharsInOnePrior.charAt(j) == 'E') {
                continue;
            }

            StringBuilder compareWith = new StringBuilder(pattLen); // to compare with pattern
            for(int k = 0; k < pattLen; k++) {
                if(j + k >= pattLen) { // reached end of characters in F(n-1), start checking F(n-2)
                    int posInFirstChars = (j + k) % pattLen;
                    if(firstCharsInTwoPrior.charAt(posInFirstChars) == 'E') {
                        break middle; // none of the remaining overlap between F(n-1) and F(n-2) is as long as pattern, so can stop here
                    } else {
                        compareWith.append(firstCharsInTwoPrior.charAt(posInFirstChars));
                    }
                } else {
                    compareWith.append(lastCharsInOnePrior.charAt(j + k));
                }
            }

            if(pattern.equals(compareWith.toString())) {
                numPattCurr++; // this overlap matched pattern
            }
        }

        // changing characters of F(n-1) and F(n-2), as needed, for next iteration
        StringBuilder[] updatedChars = updateChars(lastCharsInOnePrior, firstCharsInTwoPrior, lastCharsInTwoPrior, firstCharsInThreePrior);
        lastCharsInTwoPrior = lastCharsInOnePrior;
        firstCharsInThreePrior = firstCharsInTwoPrior;
        lastCharsInOnePrior = updatedChars[0];
        firstCharsInTwoPrior = updatedChars[1];

        // changing number of times pattern found for F(n-1) and F(n-2) for next iteration
        numPattTwoPrior = numPattOnePrior;
        numPattOnePrior = numPattCurr;
    }
    System.out.println(numPattCurr);
    System.exit(0);
}
}

I think I only left in one line of commented code, which gave the exact same answers in all the test cases when that was the only line within its else block--though what I replaced it with is more correct.

Any suggestions on what I'm missing or how I might go about debugging the last test case? Or interested in talking it through with someone because you're preparing for the contest or just working on learning algorithms? Please let me know.

share|improve this question
    
I have the impression you handled this case, but if not, note that the first six chars of 10110101101101 match with the last six so a match in F(n) could overlap with the next match. –  jwpat7 Mar 18 '13 at 21:54
    
I think a better place to ask this might be forums.topcoder.com IMHO –  Alexander Mar 18 '13 at 21:56
    
jwpat7, if I understand you correctly, I did write it so that any overlap between F(n-1) and F(n-2) that matches pattern should be accounted for in F(n) (and what doesn't overlap should come from just adding the # of times pattern was found in F(n-1) to the # of times it was found in F(n-2))--that's actually what makes up most of the logic in my code; and Alexander, thanks for the link, I'll check that out. –  Gregory Fowler Mar 18 '13 at 23:45
    
GF, I saw that you handled overlap between F(n-1) and F(n-2), but the overlap I'm referring to is that the next instance of a pattern can start within the current match. (Note, please put an @ in front of my ID so the stackexchange message system sends a notice) –  jwpat7 Mar 19 '13 at 7:22
    
@jwpat7, do you just mean that occurrences of a pattern in the Fibonacci bit string can overlap? If so, then since I use essentially a sliding window of size pattLen through the overlap between F(n-1) and F(n-2), it should catch overlapping patterns (unless I'm totally missing your point, in which case I'm very sorry). If fact, I just wrote a test for what I think you mean and it passed. If not, would you possibly be able to give a concrete example of how the overlap you describe wouldn't be caught by doing as I described? Also, is there a way we could send private messages back and forth? –  Gregory Fowler Mar 19 '13 at 17:08

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