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I have a list that contains many entries that are themselves lists. Here are some of the sublists within the main list:

>>> data[4]
['', u'BNE JCT TR92 FLO GRJCT-PERRY-BITTERSWEET', u'BNE_JCT TR92 TR92 (XF/ALTW/*)', u'KARMA-PERRY-BITTERSWEET_161', u' 01', -15.88, '']
>>> data[5]
['', u'CRETE-STJHN FLO DMNT-WLTN 765+SPS', u'ST_JOHN 34519 A (LN/NIPS/CE)', u'SPS WILTON-DUMONT+PWRTN 5+JOLIET 7', u' 01', -8.14, '']
>>> data[6]
['', u'HRNR_TR_1_TR_1_XF', u'HRNR TR_1 TR_1 (XF/AMMO/*)', '', u' 01', 1.4, '']
>>> data[7]
['', u'INDPDN  INDPDBRYAN69_11 LN', u'INDPDN INDPDBRYAN69_1 1 (LN/ALTW/ALTW)', u'ACTUAL', u' 01', 1.26, '']
>>>

I want to split column 3 in the sublists into 4 components as follows:

  • All of the string from the first character to the last non space character
  • The string encapsulated between ( and /
  • The string encapsulated between / and /
  • The string encapsulated between / and )

So I want the same list but with column 3 split into 4 columns as described above.

Example:

['', u'BNE JCT TR92 FLO GRJCT-PERRY-BITTERSWEET', u'BNE_JCT TR92 TR92', u'XF',u'ALTW','*', u'KARMA-PERRY-BITTERSWEET_161', u' 01', -15.88, '']

I am also not sure what the u that precedes the elements represents. I've been messing around with re.split() but have not been able to get this to work that preserves the original list but splits column 3 of the sublists into 4 additional columns.

I appreciate the help.

[I made an edit to remove arraylist and replace it with list]**

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1  
Python does not have arraylists, just lists, also, the u at the front stands for unicode, allowing the string to contain unicode charactors, used in non python 3.0+ versions (python 3.0+ is unicode by default). –  Serdalis Mar 18 '13 at 21:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The u at the front stands for unicode, allowing the string to contain unicode charactors, used in non python 3.0+ versions (python 3.0+ is unicode by default)

as for your split, you can do the following to split into the columns you desire:

# search for parts you need in column 3
for subitem in re.findall("(.*?) \((.*?)\)", item[2]):
    temp_split = [subitem[0]]
    temp_split.extend(subitem[1].split("/"))

You cannot add columns in the middle of a list.
You can create a new list like so:

for item_index in range(len(data)):
    item = data[item_index]

    for subitem in re.findall("(.*?) \((.*?)\)", item[2]):
        # part before the ( )
        temp_split = [subitem[0]]
        # part in the ( )
        temp_split.extend(subitem[1].split("/"))

    temp_item = item[:2]
    temp_item.extend(temp_split)
    temp_item.extend(item[3:])

    data[item_index] = temp_item
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I made a slight change to your solution (line with rstrip()). Otherwise this works. Thank you very much. –  codingknob Mar 19 '13 at 0:58
    
@algotr8der oops sorry misunderstood your first bullet point. –  Serdalis Mar 19 '13 at 2:53
    
@algotr8der here you go, I made it correct for you. –  Serdalis Mar 19 '13 at 3:39

Here's a regular expression pattern that will match the parts of the string you want:

pattern = r"(.+) \((.+)/(.+)/(.+)\)"

This is probably the simplest regex that will do the job.

Here's how you use it:

import re

for row in data:
    row[2:3] = re.match(pattern, row[2]).groups()

There's a lot going on there. The outer loop is pretty simple to understand. The inner part has two parts sections:

  1. re.match(pattern, row[2]).groups() does the regular expression matching, and returns a tuple of the values that were found (e.g. ('BNE_JCT TR92 TR92', 'XF', 'ALTW', '*')).
  2. The second bit is a slice assignment. row[slice] = some_sequence replaces the specified slice with the values from some_sequence. If there is a different number of values in the sequence than there were in the slice, the list will change size! In this case, we're replacing a single-value slice (starting at index 2, stopping before index 3) with the four values we got from the regular expression match.

Note that this code will raise an exception if the regular expression doesn't match the value in any of your rows. If there's any chance your data is going to be "messy", you should add some extra logic to detect this rather than letting it blow up.

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I tried to run your code above but get ... Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module> AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'groups' –  codingknob Mar 18 '13 at 22:41
    
@algotr8der: Yep, that's the exception I mention in the last paragraph. Some row in your data has a value that isn't matched by the pattern. I'm not sure what you want to do in that situation, since it suggests your data is corrupt in some way. There's probably a fix, but it may require some fiddling to find. You could split up the matching and slice assignment to figure out where the error is. –  Blckknght Mar 19 '13 at 7:17
import re
data = ['', u'BNE JCT TR92 FLO GRJCT-PERRY-BITTERSWEET', u'BNE_JCT TR92 TR92 (XF/ALTW/*)', u'KARMA-PERRY-BITTERSWEET_161', u' 01', -15.88, '']
_data =[]
tempStr = ""
for i in data:
    if re.match("(.+/.+/.+)", str(i)):
        for char in i:
            if (char != "(" and char != "/" and char != ")"):
                tempStr += char
            else:
                _data.append(tempStr)
                tempStr = ""
    else:
        _data.append(i)
print _data

This script will give this output:

['', u'BNE JCT TR92 FLO GRJCT-PERRY-BITTERSWEET', u'BNE_JCT TR92 TR92 ', u'XF', u'ALTW', u'*', u'KARMA-PERRY-BITTERSWEET_161', u' 01', -15.88, '']
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