Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm a little bit lost with the new ScalaJson Feature in Play Framework 2.1. I would like to write Reads and Writes in my Enumeration.

Here is my code :

object EnumA extends Enumeration {
 type EnumA = Value
 val VAL1, VAL2, VAL3 = Value

def parse(str:String) : EnumA = {
    str.toUpperCase() match {
         case "VAL1" => VAL1
         case "VAL2" => VAL2
         case "VAL3" => VAL3
         case _ => null
    }
}}

Any idea ?

Thanks.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Short answer: use something like Play Enumeration Utils.

Long answer, instead of putting a Reads in your enum, you can create a re-useable Reads for Enumeration types:

object EnumA extends Enumeration {
  type EnumA = Value
  val VAL1, VAL2, VAL3 = Value
}

object EnumUtils {
  def enumReads[E <: Enumeration](enum: E): Reads[E#Value] = new Reads[E#Value] {
    def reads(json: JsValue): JsResult[E#Value] = json match {
      case JsString(s) => {
        try {
          JsSuccess(enum.withName(s))
        } catch {
          case _: NoSuchElementException => JsError(s"Enumeration expected of type: '${enum.getClass}', but it does not appear to contain the value: '$s'")
        }
      }
      case _ => JsError("String value expected")
    }
  }
}

Then when you want to parse something to an enum, create an implicit Reads for your specific Enum type in scope:

import some.thing.EnumUtils
implicit val myEnumReads: Reads[EnumA#Value] = EnumUtils.enumReads(EnumA)

val myValue: EnumA.Value = someJsonObject.as[EnumA.Value]

or

val myValue: EnumA.Value = someJsonObject.asOpt[EnumA.Value].getOrElse(sys.error("Oh noes! Invalid value!"))

(It's considered bad form to use null in Scala.)

Writing enums as JsValues is simpler:

object EnumUtils {
  ...
  implicit def enumWrites[E <: Enumeration]: Writes[E#Value] = new Writes[E#Value] {
    def writes(v: E#Value): JsValue = JsString(v.toString)
  }
}

Then just import that into scope before you attempt to write an enum (or pass it explicitly to the toJson function:

import EnumUtils.enumWrites
val myEnumJson: JsValue = Json.toJson(EnumA.VAL1)

You can similarly make a function to create a Format object combining both Reads and Writes:

object EnumUtils {
  ....
  implicit def enumFormat[E <: Enumeration](enum: E): Format[E#Value] = {
    Format(EnumReader.enumReads(enum), EnumWriter.enumWrites)
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
When I try your code in the repl I get the following error implicit val myEnumReads: Reads[EnumA#Value] = EnumUtils.enumReads(EnumA) error: not found: type EnumA implicit val myEnumReads: Reads[EnumA#Value] = EnumUtils.enumReads(EnumA) ^ –  smk Mar 25 '13 at 1:19
1  
@smk: The OPs context was implicit in the code I posted. I have updated it to be included now. Here's the full thing as a gist –  Mikesname Mar 25 '13 at 15:13
    
Thank you very much. –  smk Mar 25 '13 at 16:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.