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I'm writing a equals(Object obj) function for a class. I see that it is possible to access the private fields of obj from the caller. So instead of using a getter:

Odp other = (Odp) obj;
if (! other.getCollection().contains(ftw)) {

}

I can just access the field directly:

Odp other = (Odp) obj;
if (! other.collection.contains(ftw)) {

}

Is this bad practice?

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1  
May not be an exact duplicate but very close: stackoverflow.com/questions/1540159/… –  ChssPly76 Oct 10 '09 at 20:19

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, it's not. The reason that private variables and methods are not accessable from other classes is to allow you to change the internals of your class without having to change all the code that uses the class (that and to prevent the user of your class from e.g. setting a variable to a value that it's never supposed to have).

If you use private variables of other objects that doesn't hurt anything, because if you'd restructure your class's internals, you'd have to change the code inside the class anyway.

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1  
Just because it will work 99% of the time doesn't mean it's the right thing to do. It breaks encapsulation and couples the classes more tightly for no other reason than saving typing five characters. Please see my answer. –  dj_segfault Oct 11 '09 at 4:21
3  
"couples the classes more tightly together" - which classes? There is only one class concerned here, and you can't "uncouple" a class from itself. –  sepp2k Oct 11 '09 at 11:16
1  
Not necessarily. The parameter passed to equals() is not necessarily the exact same class. –  dj_segfault Oct 13 '09 at 14:04
    
^ u mean, ClassCastException? ;) –  yihtserns Feb 8 '10 at 15:44
1  
I disagree with this answer. It is better to use accessors. –  Nicolas Barbulesco Aug 21 '13 at 9:27

I tend to always use getters, because sometimes a getter isn't just "return(foo)". Sometimes they initialize things if they're null, or have some debug logging in them, or validate the current state in some way. It's more consistent.

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+1 If for whatever reason "collection" can be renamed to clearer state it's purpose, I would rather change it in one place instead of every where the getter would've been used. –  Andrew Campbell Jan 15 at 15:12

I dont think this is bad practice, but a feature of the language. It not only allows you to test equals the way you do, but it is also useful in a Prototype pattern for object creation.

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That is fine and completely normal. It is a little bit odd to think that this can fiddle with the private fields of other, but it's okay because there's no way anything bad can happen as far as some third party being able to muck with an Odp object's internals. Any method of the Odp class can modify any private members of any Odp object, even non-this ones, but that's fine since any such methods can obviously be trusted!

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This is a duplication of

Why can I access my private variables of the "other" object directly, in my equals(Object o) method

Private data is accessible by any instance of that class, even if one instance of class A is accessing the private members of another instance of A. It's important to remember that that access modifiers (private, protected, public) are controlling class access, not instance access

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Using private member for entity class may caused proxy class work incorrectly. Imagine hibernate create class by lazy query. If you check member variable , it return null. But if you call get() , it will fetch data from database and initialise the field.

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