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I have an object with lots of properties that I would like to test. I have written a TestMethod for each property, but the problem is that many of the properties manipulate the others when they are set. What I need is to be able to set up my test object, manipulate one of the variables, run the tests, reset the object to its original state, then repeat the process. That way, I can avoid having so much redundancy.

I looked into using a Data Driven approach (which is a perfect solution to this problem), but that doesn't seem to be available with the Silverlight Test Framework, since I can't find a way to use the DataSource attribute. I thought about trying to see if I could get access to the DataSource through the traditional MSTest framework, but alas, I only have Visual Studio Express.

I've thought to try to look into creating a custom test harness to see if that could solve this problem, but I thought I'd ask around for suggestions first.

Maybe I should just suck it up and write up all of the different configurations as separate TestInitialize Methods and comment out the ones I don't need as I go.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Update/Clarification:

Here is an example of how the object to be tested works. Say you have a shape with a position coordinate and coordinates for each side. When you Update the coordinates of the position or one of the sides, all other coordinates must be updated as well.

This is the functionality that is under test. What I would like to do is be able to set up multiple initializations (through ClassInitialize or what have you) where I would set up the initial value of my object and a mock containing the expected test results, then alter one of the properties in question. Something like this (this is for illustration only, so please ignore any poor practices xD):

// class under test (mock has the same properties & constructor)
public class MySquare
{
    public Vector2 XYPosition;
    public int Width;
    public int Height;
    public float TopSidePosition;
    public float RightSidePosition;
    ...

    public MySquare(float x, float y, int width, int height)
    {
        // set up all properties
    }
}

// test object container
public class Container
{
    public static MySquare square;
    public static MySquareMock squareMock;
}

// desired test class initializations (it would be nice to be able to run each of these
// as well as the TestMethods and then reset to the next TestSetupClass)
[TestClass]
public class TestSetupClass1
{
    [ClassInitialize]
    public void SetupTest()
    {
        // set up initial value and expected result
        Container.square = new MySquare(0, 0, 5, 5);
        Container.squareMock = new MySquareMock(1, 1, 5, 5);

        Container.square.XYPosition = new Vector2(1, 1);
    }
}

[TestClass]
public class TestSetupClass2
{
    [ClassInitialize]
    public void SetupTest()
    {
        // set up initial value and expected result
        Container.square = new MySquare(0, 0, 5, 5);
        Container.squareMock = new MySquareMock(1, 0, 5, 5);

        Container.square.RightSidePosition = 6;
    }
}

// test methods
[TestClass]
public class TestMethods
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void TestPosition()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(Container.squareMock.XYPosition, Container.square.XYPosition);
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestTopSidePosition()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(Container.squareMock.XYTopSidePosition, Container.square.TopSidePosition);
    }

    // test method for each property
}
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Can't you create new object for each test? This way you start with initial state every time, which is what you should be doing anyways. –  jimmy_keen Mar 19 '13 at 0:01
    
@jimmy_keen Yeah, I'd like to do that, but I don't want to have to have the same 20 test methods over and over for each class. Do you think that's the best way to go? –  Thick_propheT Mar 19 '13 at 4:06
    
That depends. If you need to write "same 20 test methods" for each class then problem lies elsewhere (why different classes are doing same job that requires testing?). It's hard to give any meaningful hints without more context. –  jimmy_keen Mar 20 '13 at 17:50
    
I made some clarifications above. –  Thick_propheT Mar 20 '13 at 18:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I didn't find a completely automated way of achieving my original goal, but I did come up with something pretty easy.

First, I created a singleton TestManager class to handle nearly all of my test setup, so that I only need one line in my MainPage (the test page) class. Within the TestManager, I added a string variable that I assign a name of a TestSetup class too from the MainPage.

Then, I created another TestClass called TestSetupClass and gave two static fields:

private static Type childType;
private static TestSetupClass childInstance;

In its constructor, I compare the underlying type to the class name specified in the TestManager and set the childType and childInstance if they match:

Type thisType = GetType().UnderlyingSystemType;

if (thisType.Name.Equals(TestManager.Instance.SetupClassName))
{
    childType = thisType;
    childInstance = this;
}

Next, I added a virtual method to the TestSetupClass with an AssemblyInitialize attribute. All of my setup classes inherit from TestSetupClass and override this method. Within the method, I use the childType to get MethodInfo for the child's overridden implementation of the method and invoke it using the childInstance:

MethodInfo childSetup = childType.GetMethod("Setup");
childSetup.Invoke(childInstance, null);

And voila! When you want to run a specific setup before running all the tests, you just specify its class name in the MainPage using the TestManager.

I know there are a few more places where I could have made this better, but it works, so what can you do.

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