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Suppose I have a queue with elements in ascending order, i.e. head < 2nd < 3rd < ... < tail

and a stack with elements in descending order, i.e. top > 2nd > 3rd > ...

and their size differ at most 1 (they could be of same size).

What is the most efficient way of merging them together into the same queue (or stack) as a single sorted sequence without additional stack/queue?

It seems that the best I thought of so far is a quadratic algorithm that is basically selection sort, and it doesn't really take advantage of the fact that the queue and the stack are pre-sorted and their size. I am wondering if we can do better?

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a second stack? – wildplasser Mar 19 '13 at 0:20
    
Sorry I am not quite sure what you mean...? I don't want to use additional stack/queue as temporary storage. I want to figure out a way that's fastest given the limited storage. – Enzo Mar 19 '13 at 0:25
    
Well, then maybe reverse the stack before merging? – wildplasser Mar 19 '13 at 0:26
    
Ah! How did I not think of that... Thank you! – Enzo Mar 19 '13 at 0:31
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just merge in place, placing your result at the end of the queue. Keep a count so you know when to finish. This is O(n).

This does it in python. I haven't used queue or stack classes but you'll see the q lists are FIFO and the s lists are LIFO!

The most interesting debug case is enabled so you can see the output.

def sort(Q, S, debug=False):
  q = Q
  s = S
  size = len(Q) + len(S)
  handled = 0
  while handled < size:
    move_from_queue = len(s) == 0 or (len(q) > 0 and q[0] < s[0])
    last_from_stack = (handled == size-1) and (len(s) == 1)
    if move_from_queue and not last_from_stack:
      q_front = q[0]
      q = q[1:] + [q_front]
      msg = 'moved q[0]=%d to end, q=%r' % (q_front, q)
    else:
      (s_top, s) = (s[0], s[1:])
      q += [s_top]
      msg = 'popped s[0]=%d to end of q=%r,s=%r' % (s_top, q, s)
    handled += 1
    if debug:
      print 'Debug-Step %d: %s' % (handled, msg)
  return (q, s)

def test_sort(Q, S, debug=False):
  print 'Pre  Q: %r' % Q
  print 'Pre  S: %r' % S
  (Q, S) = sort(Q, S, debug)
  print 'Sorted: %r' % Q
  print

if __name__ == "__main__":
  test_sort([1, 3, 7, 9], [2, 5, 5])
  test_sort([1, 3, 7], [2, 5, 5])
  test_sort([1, 3, 7], [2, 5, 5, 9], True)
  test_sort([], [])
  test_sort([1], [])
  test_sort([], [1])

Output:

Pre  Q: [1, 3, 7, 9]
Pre  S: [2, 5, 5]
Sorted: [1, 2, 3, 5, 5, 7, 9]

Pre  Q: [1, 3, 7]
Pre  S: [2, 5, 5]
Sorted: [1, 2, 3, 5, 5, 7]

Pre  Q: [1, 3, 7]
Pre  S: [2, 5, 5, 9]
Debug-Step 1: moved q[0]=1 to end, q=[3, 7, 1]
Debug-Step 2: popped s[0]=2 to end of q=[3, 7, 1, 2],s=[5, 5, 9]
Debug-Step 3: moved q[0]=3 to end, q=[7, 1, 2, 3]
Debug-Step 4: popped s[0]=5 to end of q=[7, 1, 2, 3, 5],s=[5, 9]
Debug-Step 5: popped s[0]=5 to end of q=[7, 1, 2, 3, 5, 5],s=[9]
Debug-Step 6: moved q[0]=7 to end, q=[1, 2, 3, 5, 5, 7]
Debug-Step 7: popped s[0]=9 to end of q=[1, 2, 3, 5, 5, 7, 9],s=[]
Sorted: [1, 2, 3, 5, 5, 7, 9]

Pre  Q: []
Pre  S: []
Sorted: []

Pre  Q: [1]
Pre  S: []
Sorted: [1]

Pre  Q: []
Pre  S: [1]
Sorted: [1]
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