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I've got the following code:

while rounds<=5
    fprintf('Rolling the dice...\n');
    roll=randi(6,1,5);
    roll=sort(roll);
    fprintf('You rolled:');
    disp(roll);
    rollCount=rollCount+1;

    for x=1:2:17
        y=all(ismember(roll,rule{x}))
        disp(ismember(roll,rule{x}));

        z=all(ismember(rule{x},roll))
        disp(ismember(rule{x},roll));
        rounds=rounds+1;
    end
end 

What it SHOULD do is compare the roll array to the rule{x} array and tell me if it's a match. If it's not a match, it should tell me which indexes of the roll array aren't matching the rule array. It's not working correctly however. Say the example roll is [2 2 3 5 5] and the rule{x} is [1 2 3 4 5].

The output I'd like is an array that has [0 1 1 0 1] but the ones I get out of y is [1 1 1 1 1] and for z is [0 1 1 0 1]. That might seem like the right output, but if we change the rule to [5 5 5 5 5] I get [1 1 1 1 1] which is incorrect.

This is for a Yahtzee game I'm writing. The roll is the roll of the dice, and the rule is what I'm trying to match against so I can see what ones I need to re-roll to try and get it to match.

EDIT: Using the code from dspyz, I wrote the function:

function[scoreCode]=ForwardChaining(rollFunc,ruleFunc)
temp=histc(rollFunc,1:6);

for x=1:2:11
    if (ruleFunc{x}<=temp)
        scoreCode=ruleFunc{x+1};
        break;        
    else scoreCode=0;
    end    
end

The main function calls this as:

c= ForwardChaining(roll,rule);
    if c == 12;
        break;
    end

But for some reason, even after 100,000 iterations it doesn't stop, which I take as it not working as intended.

share|improve this question
    
Check this post –  Parag S. Chandakkar Mar 19 '13 at 1:10
    
What's in your ruleFunc array? –  dspyz Mar 19 '13 at 3:07
    
That is the array of numbers that has the histogram rules. I think it was actually working properly. It's just that the break; doesn't seem to break when I wanted it to. I tested it out a bunch of times and eventually got it working. On to figuring out how to re-roll the numbers that don't match the rules. –  Seldom Mar 19 '13 at 3:14
    
ForwardChainingRule returns scoreCode which is an element of ruleFunc. But if ruleFunc is a list of histograms, then none of them are just the number 12 –  dspyz Mar 19 '13 at 17:54
    
ruleFunc has every other line the score that the line above gives. So the first line is 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 and the second line is 12. That 12 gets passed back to the original function to be interpreted as what the score for that dice roll is. This example here though is really rough. I'm working step by step slowly working in additional features but making sure that the program works as a whole so if I don't complete it all, I have something to turn in. –  Seldom Mar 19 '13 at 18:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since the dice can only take on values from 1 to 6. Why not instead generate the histogram counts of each roll.

ie take your (row-)vector of rolls v and say

a = histc(roll, 1:6);

Now if you want to check if a rule is a subset of a (where the rule itself is also phrased in terms of counts of each number), you can just check if

rule <= a

The roll satisfies the rule if this is true in all 6 indices

To clarify:

I don't know about a first-grader, but given a set of (possibly-repeated) values for example [1, 1, 2, 4, 5] where everything is from 1 to 6, we can represent this by counting how many of each number from 1 to 6 is present. In this example:

1: 2
2: 1
3: 0
4: 1
5: 1
6: 0

Now we want to compare this against a rule of the same form but with possibly fewer elements. For example [1, 2, 3, 4]. The counts for this rule would be

1: 1
2: 1
3: 1
4: 1
5: 0
6: 0

To check if [1, 2, 3, 4] is a subset of [1, 1, 2, 4, 5], we only need to know if the counts for [1, 2, 3, 4] are all less than or equal to the counts of [1, 1, 2, 4, 5]. Ie we want to check if

1: 1 <= 2
2: 1 <= 1
3: 1 <= 0
4: 1 <= 1
5: 0 <= 1
6: 0 <= 0

All of these are true except for 3 so we know that [1 2 3 4] is not a subset of [1 1 2 4 6] because it contains no 3

But if all 6 inequalities are true, then it would be

ex. If you want to know if [1 3 3 3 5] contains [3 3 3], you can check all of

1: 0 <= 1
2: 0 <= 0
3: 3 <= 3
4: 0 <= 0
5: 0 <= 1
6: 0 <= 0

which is true

EDIT: Looking at MATLAB's documentation, it says the argument to histc must be sorted

EDIT 2: Oops, got that wrong, it says the second argument must be sorted. Changing it back.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you elaborate this, or rephrase if you were talking to a 1st grader? I'm a complete math noob and don't quite get what you're saying. –  Seldom Mar 19 '13 at 1:22
    
Okay, that makes sense. So the first line of example code you provided will take the array of 5 elements and count how many of them there are and store them into array a? –  Seldom Mar 19 '13 at 1:39
    
Yes, that's exactly what I'm doing (assuming those elements are 6-sided die rolls. If you have dice with more sides, you may need to change the 6's to be larger) –  dspyz Mar 19 '13 at 1:39
    
What portion of it would I replace if the name my array that has the roll in it is 'roll'? –  Seldom Mar 19 '13 at 1:41
1  
actually I noticed that matlab has a "histc" function. Let me fix my answer to use that instead –  dspyz Mar 19 '13 at 1:44

I am not sure what your arrays are doing exactly, but the idea is you do if you have [2 2 3 5 5] and the rule{x} is [1 2 3 4 5], simply doing:

[2 2 3 5 5] == [1 2 3 4 5] will get you [0 1 1 0 1] or something like A=(roll==rule)

share|improve this answer
    
Will the "==" compare the elements on an index to index basis? If so, that won't work, because some of the rules only have 4 elements in the index. –  Seldom Mar 19 '13 at 0:43

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