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I'm trying to create the following array:

"Fruits", 25, {
    {"Apple", 2}, 
    {"Grapes", 13}, 
    {"Melon", 10}
}
"Meats", 40, {
     {"Beef", 9}, 
     {"Chicken", 27}, 
     {"Pork", 4}
 }

...

Feels like there's a more elegant way of doing what I got so far. Any feedback/samples on how to create this structure more efficient given the input struct would be appreciated.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

typedef struct Product {
    char *name;
    int qty;
} Prods;

typedef struct Category {
    char *name;
    int qty;
    int prods_count;
    Prods *prod;
} Cats;

typedef struct Inventory {
    Cats *cat;
    int cats_count;
} Inv;

struct tmp_input {
    char name[12];
    int qty;
    char cat[12];
};

// return index if found
int in_array(Inv *inv, char *k) {
    int i;
    if (inv->cats_count == 0)
        return -1;
    for (i = 0; i < inv->cats_count; i++) {
        if (strcmp (k, inv->cat[i].name) == 0) return i;
    }
    return -1;
}

int main () {
    int i, j, exists = 0;
    // temp struct.
    struct tmp_input items[] = {
        {"Apple", 2, "Fruit"}, {"Coke", 10, "Drink"},   {"Pork", 4, "Meat"},
        {"Beef", 9, "Meat"},   {"Chicken", 27, "Meat"}, {"Melon", 10, "Fruit"},
        {"Tea", 3, "Drink"},   {"Coffee", 20, "Drink"}, {"Grapes", 13, "Fruit"}
    };

    size_t len = sizeof (items) / sizeof (struct tmp_input);

    Inv *inven = malloc(sizeof(Inv));
    inven->cats_count = 0;
    inven->cat = calloc(1, sizeof(Cats));

    for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        exists = in_array(inven, items[i].cat);
        // category does not exist
        if (exists == -1) {
            inven->cat = realloc(inven->cat, sizeof(Cats) * (inven->cats_count + 1));
            inven->cat[inven->cats_count].name = strdup(items[i].cat);
            inven->cat[inven->cats_count].qty += items[i].qty;

            inven->cat[inven->cats_count].prods_count = 1;
            inven->cat[inven->cats_count].prod = calloc (1, sizeof (Prods));
            inven->cat[inven->cats_count].prod->name = strdup (items[i].name);
            inven->cat[inven->cats_count].prod->qty = items[i].qty;
            inven->cats_count++;
        }
        // category found
        else  {
            inven->cat[exists].qty += items[i].qty;

            int size = inven->cat[exists].prods_count + 1;
            inven->cat[exists].prod = realloc(inven->cat[exists].prod, sizeof(Prods) * (size));
            inven->cat[exists].prod[size - 1].name = strdup (items[i].name);
            inven->cat[exists].prod[size - 1].qty= items[i].qty;
            inven->cat[exists].prods_count++;
        }
    }

    for (i = 0; i < inven->cats_count; i++) {
        printf("%3d %s\n", inven->cat[i].qty, inven->cat[i].name);
        for (j = 0; j < inven->cat[i].prods_count; j++) {
            printf("%3d %s\n", inven->cat[i].prod[j].qty, inven->cat[i].prod[j].name);
        }
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Are there always three products in each category? –  teppic Mar 19 '13 at 0:59
    
@teppic: no, there can be x amount of products per category. –  Pete Darrow Mar 19 '13 at 1:05
    
Is x a set maximum? Or does it need to be completely flexible? –  teppic Mar 19 '13 at 1:05
    
it is completely flexible. –  Pete Darrow Mar 19 '13 at 1:07
1  
The most obvious choice would be a linked list. The product structure can contain a pointer to the next product structure, and so on, ending in NULL. They're extremely common in C. You start with the first item (which would be contained in the Category structure), and then follow the links in a loop to access the elements. –  teppic Mar 19 '13 at 1:16
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You aren't allocating any memory for the Prod array.

Something like

...

if (exists == -1) {
    inven->cat = realloc(inven->cat, sizeof(Cats) * (inven->cats_count + 1));
    inven->cat[inven->cats_count].name = items[i].cat;
    inven->cat[inven->cats_count].qty += items[i].qty;

    // Allocate memory for 1 product
    inven->cat[inven->cats_count].prods_count = 1;
    inven->cat[inven->cats_count].prod = malloc (sizeof (Prods));

    // Now allocate space and copy the name
    inven->cat[inven->cats_count].prod->name = strdup (items[i].name + 1);

    inven->cats_count++;
}
...

I will leave it to you to handle the case where there are more than 1 product in a category, where you'll need to reallocate the memory again.

Another error is that you need to allocate and copy the category name

inven->cat[inven->cats_count].name = items[i].cat;

should be replaced by

inven->cat[inven->cats_count].name = strdup (items[i].cat);

This is because the items array does not exist outside of this function, so if you just do

inven->cat[inven->cats_count].name = items[i].cat;

then after you leave this function, invent->cat[inven->cats_count].name will point to garbage memory.

A final suggestion would be to split each structure into a function that handles creation of it, just to clean up the code.

--- edit to add comments on Abstract Data Types

Arrays are useful if you have data that you know you will be accessing via indices. If you don't know the index of the item you want (as in this case), an array is less useful.

Unlike other comments, I don't think using a Linked List really gives you anything useful. Linked Lists are useful when you need to walk sequentially through all the items, without really caring where they are in the list. It seems to me that the most common use case for a system like you are creating is searching: Do we have any Fruit in stock? Add 10 cases of Coke to the inventory... those sorts of things.

Also, you only want a single entry for each category/product. You don't want 3 Fruit categories in the data. Both arrays and linked lists don't really have any restrictions on adding the same structure multiple times. This means that every time you'll need to check the whole list to see if you need to add the new structure.

For that reason, I'd certainly make both the Categories and products arrays into hashtables (or called a dictionary in some languages) that map name -> structure. This will speed up your search as you don't have to search the entire dataset every time and will prevent you from adding the same structure multiple times.

Wikipedia article on Hashtables: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashtable

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I got it to work. Now would you also recommend using a linked list as opposed to what I have have (question updated)? –  Pete Darrow Mar 19 '13 at 2:12
    
I'll update my answer with my comments on what abstract data types I'd use. –  iain Mar 19 '13 at 11:41
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Here's an example of how to set up the structures dynamically (simpler than a linked list, but not as flexible).

typedef struct Product {
   char *name;
   int qty;
} Prods;

typedef struct Category {
   char *name;
   int qty;
   int prods_count;
   Prods *prod;      // dynamic array of Products
} Cats;

The structures as they were.

   struct Category categ[10];

An arbitrary number of categories, for now take categ[0] for 'Fruits'.

Next dynamically create an array of 10 product structures:

   Prods *prod_array = malloc(sizeof(Prods) * 10); // i.e. prod_array[0] to [9]

Now just store the array in the category structure:

   categ[0].prod = prod_array;
   categ[0].prods_count = 10;

If you need to access the product name, it's just: categ[i].prod[j].name

Now, if you need another 10 products, you can just use realloc to increase the size of the array, and update its count.

Put all these things in functions, and the code isn't too complex.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I got it to work (question updated). Could you please elaborate a bit more how to work with the linked list? I feel it's not too clean/elegant the way I have it. –  Pete Darrow Mar 19 '13 at 2:14
    
@PeteDarrow - if you simply want an open ended list, this would be easier. Linked lists are extremely flexible but a bit more work. You basically malloc a new product structure each time you want one, and insert it in the list. Every structure has a pointer to another structure (usually it's written struct Product *next;). When next is NULL, you're at the end of the list. If you search the site you'll find loads of examples I expect. –  teppic Mar 19 '13 at 2:17
    
I'll look into linked lists. Thanks! –  Pete Darrow Mar 19 '13 at 2:23
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