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I am trying to use a FileInputStream to essentially read in a text file, and then output it in a different text file. However, I always get very strange characters when I do this. I'm sure it's some simple mistake I'm making, thanks for any help or pointing me in the right direction. Here's what I've got so far.

    File sendFile = new File(fileName);
    FileInputStream fileIn = new FileInputStream(sendFile);
    byte buf[] = new byte[1024];
    while(fileIn.read(buf) > 0) {
        System.out.println(buf);
    }

The file it is reading from is just a big text file of regular ASCII characters. Whenever I do the system.out.println, however, I get the output [B@a422ede. Any ideas on how to make this work? Thanks

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Note that you can't read text/strings/characters with an InputStream. You need a Reader for that. You can convert bytes to characters with an InputStreamReader. –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 19 '13 at 1:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This happens because you are printing a byte array object itself, rather than printing its content. You should construct a String from the buffer and a length, and print that String instead. The constructor to use for this is

String s = new String(buf, 0, len, charsetName);

Above, len should be the value returned by the call of the read() method. The charsetName should represent the encoding used by the underlying file.

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4  
No, that's definitely not the constructor to use! Whenever you're converting from bytes to a string or from a string to bytes, you need an encoding! new String(bytes, encoding). If you don't specify an encoding, you get the platform default, which is for all intents and purposes random. Also you can't use any random offset and length into a buffer, you may end up cutting off a multibyte character. –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 19 '13 at 1:25
    
@ChristofferHammarström You're right, I added the 4-th arg. Thanks! –  dasblinkenlight Mar 19 '13 at 1:28
1  
Also, len should not be the value returned by the read() method, as it may cut in the middle of a multibyte character and isn't guaranteed to read all of the file. Use an InputStreamReader instead. –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 19 '13 at 1:32

If you're reading from a file to another file, you shouldn't convert the bytes to a string at all, just write the bytes read into the other file.

If your intention is to convert a text file from an encoding to another, read from a new InputStreamReader(in, sourceEncoding), and write to a new OutputStreamWriter(out, targetEncoding).

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All, pay attention to christoffer-hammarstrom@'s comments on other answer's here as well. –  cdunn2001 Mar 31 '13 at 19:23

That's because printing buf will print the reference to the byte array, not the bytes themselves as String as you would expect. You need to do new String(buf) to construct the byte array into string

Also consider using BufferedReader rather than creating your own buffer. With it you can just do

String line = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("filename.txt")).readLine();
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1  
No, never use FileReader, it should be deprecated, because it has no way of specifying an encoding. Which means your text will be randomly corrupted depending on the platform encoding, which is essentially random. –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 19 '13 at 1:38
1  
Also, never use BufferedReader.readLine() for data that you need to read exactly as it is. It eats your newline characters, so you can never be sure you have a perfect copy of the newlines in the input. –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 19 '13 at 1:41

Your loop should look like this:

int len;
while((len = fileIn.read(buf)) > 0) {
        System.out.write(buf, 0, len);
    }

You are (a) using the wrong method and (b) ignoring the length returned by read(), other than checking it for < 0. So you are printing junk at the end of each buffer.

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the object 's defualt toString method is return object's id in the memory. byte buf[] is an object.

you can print using this.

File sendFile = new File(fileName);
FileInputStream fileIn = new FileInputStream(sendFile);
byte buf[] = new byte[1024];

while(fileIn.read(buf) > 0) {
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(buf));
}

or

 File sendFile = new File(fileName);
FileInputStream fileIn = new FileInputStream(sendFile);
byte buf[] = new byte[1024];
int len=0;
while((len=fileIn.read(buf)) > 0) {
    for(int i=0;i<len;i++){
        System.out.print(buf[i]);
    }
    System.out.println();
}
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The first version does not work as it takes no account of the length returned by read(). The second version is several times as complex as necessary. All you need is System.out.write(buf, 0, len); –  EJP Mar 19 '13 at 4:47

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