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Hi I am new to programming and have been working on a calculator for a while now. I am trying to add some trig functions in and I am having trouble with sine. The other functions work (+, -, *, /) but when I put in "sine" it skips to the part of the code where it says it is an incorrect function. Please help out with my code. Thanks!

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>


int main() 
{

    float firstnum, secondnum, angle, answer, pi;
    char function, sine;


    pi = atan(1.0)*4;


    printf("\nHello and welcome to my calculator!\n");

    while(1) 
    {      

        printf("\nPlease input the function you would like to use.  These include +, -, *, /, sine.\n");     
        scanf("%s", &function);   



        switch(function)
        {
            case '+': 
            printf("\nNow please input the two variables.\n");  
            scanf("%f", &firstnum);
            scanf("%f", &secondnum);
            answer = firstnum+secondnum;
            break;

            case '-': 
            printf("\nNow please input the two variables.\n");  
            scanf("%f", &firstnum);
            scanf("%f", &secondnum);
            answer = firstnum-secondnum;
            break;

            case '*': 
            printf("\nNow please input the two variables.\n");  
            scanf("%f", &firstnum);
            scanf("%f", &secondnum);
            answer = firstnum*secondnum;
            break;

            case '/': 
            printf("\nNow please input the two variables.\n");  
            scanf("%f", &firstnum);
            scanf("%f", &secondnum);
            answer = firstnum/secondnum;
            break;

            case 'sine':
            printf("\nPlease enter the angle.\n");
            scanf("%f", &angle);
            answer = sin(angle);
            break;



            default: printf("Sorry, that is an incorrect function.  The only available choices are +, -, *, /, sine.");
            break;
        }   

        printf("Your answer is %f \n", answer);  
        printf("\nWhen you are ready to quit, simply press Ctrl + C or just hit the X button in the top right.\n");
    } 

     return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
The issue is related to the switch statement taking an integer, and each of the cases being an integer. A single character can be represented as its ascii value. Multiple characters are trickier. I unfortunately don't recall how they are handled. – Moshe Mar 19 '13 at 1:47
2  
Not sure why someone downvoted this, being a beginner is not a sin. You asked a clear question and provided code, +1 – Ed S. Mar 19 '13 at 1:52
    
You're not advised to learn programming starting with C. Consider the same program in python (compare the amount of code and also the use of the operators map): pastebin.com/ew6ps8mv – hdante Mar 19 '13 at 2:24
    
OP Symbol (function:string) convert to a constant value. -> swicth(it) – BLUEPIXY Mar 19 '13 at 8:29
'sine'

That is a multi-character literal. function is a single character. It's integral value is checked in the switch statement. You will likely never be able to consume a single character from the user which matches sine in the way that you are attempting to do so. Read a string (a char*) instead.

From the standard:

C99 6.4.4.4p10: "The value of an integer character constant containing more than one character (e.g., 'ab'), or containing a character or escape sequence that does not map to a single-byte execution character, is implementation-defined."

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Ed for answering. Where and how would I read this string "a char*"? I'm sorry if this is a totally easy question I just suck at this! – Matt Price Mar 19 '13 at 1:52
    
Actually Matt's already reading a string with the scanf("%s",...) however putting it in a single character, which will overwrite memory after the single character function corrupting the memory and probably allowing for buffer overflow execution attacks. – wich Mar 19 '13 at 2:06
    
@wich: Wow, I somehow glossed over that. Good call. – Ed S. Mar 19 '13 at 2:21
    
@MattPrice: The format specifier %s tells scanf to read the input into a preallocated buffer. You are passing in a single, uninitialized char, which is interpreted as an address. This is UB. That code is broken. Change function to a char* and allocate memory for it to point to dynamically or declare it as an array (char[]) and pass it to scanf. Next, use a safer version of scanf which takes a third argument; the number of characters to read. This prevents the function from overrunning your buffer. – Ed S. Mar 19 '13 at 2:23

C does not have a first class string type. This means that you cannot use a switch statement for strings, you will need to use functions such as strlcmp for string comparison.

Depending on your objective (either making a calculator, or learning C) it might be wise to either switch to a different language with higher abstraction levels, or start with lower level exercises from a good C textbook.

Also, please be aware that working with strings and user input correctly in C, that is without security holes, is much more difficult than it would seem at first. If your objective is learning a language perhaps learning C++ is a better bet where you have std::string to handle your comparisons and iostreams to handle your input and output.

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