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I am modelling classes in Java to store a JSON , for a particular JSON

  "id":1,
  "firstName":"sample",
  "lastName":"person",
   "Books":{
    "bookName":"gone with the wind"
    "isbn":  12345
    }

I created a class person with int id , String firstName etc... what would be the best way to store bookName , make a class Books with a String bookName and int isbn , how would I represent books in the person class , As an array? since books always has only one value is there a better way to represent it

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Books have two values, bookName and isbn. And yes, an array. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Mar 19 '13 at 2:02

1 Answer 1

For json serialization/deserialization, I suggest the jackson library.Here is my code,it works fine on my computer!

I store the json in the file named json.data as following:


{"id":1,
 "firstName":"sample",
 "lastName":"person",
 "books":[{"bookName":"gone with the wind","isbn":12345}]
}

And the code,I omitted the getter/setter to be short

public class Book
{
    private String bookName;
    private int isbn;

}

public class BookWriter
{
    private String id;
    private String firstName;
    private String lastName;
    private Book[] books;
}

public class JSONTest
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
            BookWriter writer=(BookWriter)mapper.readValue(new File("json.data"), BookWriter.class);
            for(Book book:writer.getBooks())
            {
            System.out.println(book.getBookName()+","+book.getIsbn());
            }
        } catch (Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

}
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Note: if fields were public, you wouldn't even need getters/setters. –  StaxMan Mar 19 '13 at 3:06

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