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I am working on a POC for RabbitMQ for an M2M solution. I have a large number of physical devices that will be publishing data (simulating clients using the Java client for now - eventually over MQTT). I want to:

  1. subscribe and journal all raw data to the database
  2. subscribe to sub-sets of the data by data type so I can scale solutions for those types of data independently
  3. publish new events through the exchange (e.g. take a raw event, make it more useful and resubmit it through the system)

Each message has a routing key like key:value.key:value.key:value.messageType:1 and data from the devices has an extra key of FROMDEVICE.MESSAGETYPE:1.key:value... etc. The subscriber that saves the raw data from the device builds a queue from the exchange with the routing key #.FROMDEVICE.# (case #1 above). The subscriber that takes a specific message type and value-adds it builds a queue with the routing key #.MESSAGETYPE:1.# (case #2 above) and submits a new message to the same exchange removing FROMDEVICE from the routing key and replacing .MESSAGETYPE:1 with .MESSAGETYPE:101 (case #3 above). There is then an independent subscriber/queue for the new message type.

Everything is fine except my subscriber that should only receive the data from the devices is also getting the value added data (MESSAGETYPE:101) even though the routingKey it should be searching for does not exist in the re-published/value-added message.

  • FROMDEVICE.MESSAGETYPE:1 ->
    • should match routing key #.FROMDEVICE.#
    • should match #.MESSAGETYPE:1.#
  • MESSAGETYPE:101
    • should match routing key #.MESSAGETYPE:101.#
    • should NOT match #.FROMDEVICE.# (but does)

Code to subscribe to data from devices only:

public class HandlerWriteEverythingFromDevice {

private final static String EXCHANGE_NAME = "logsTopicDurable";
private final static String QUEUE_NAME = "fromDevice";
/**
 * Writes all data from device to a data store.
 */
public static void main(String[] args) throws java.io.IOException, java.lang.InterruptedException {
    ConnectionFactory factory = new ConnectionFactory();
    factory.setHost("192.168.56.101");
    Connection connection = factory.newConnection();
    Channel channel = connection.createChannel();

    channel.exchangeDeclare(EXCHANGE_NAME, "topic", true);
    channel.queueDeclare(QUEUE_NAME, true, false, false, null);

    System.out.println(" [*] listens for messages from devices - durable!");

    channel.basicQos(1);

    String routingKey = "#.fromDevice.#".toUpperCase();

    channel.queueBind(QUEUE_NAME, EXCHANGE_NAME, routingKey); //bind to all selected messages
    System.out.println(" [*] subscribing to: " + routingKey);

    System.out.println(" [*] Waiting for messages. To exit press CTRL_C");

    QueueingConsumer consumer = new QueueingConsumer(channel);
    boolean autoAck = false; //ack back when done
    channel.basicConsume(QUEUE_NAME, autoAck, consumer);
    int msgCount = 0;
    while (true) {
        QueueingConsumer.Delivery delivery = consumer.nextDelivery();
        String message = new String(delivery.getBody());

        System.out.println(" [x] Message Count: " + ++msgCount + " ROUTINGKEY: '" + delivery.getEnvelope().getRoutingKey() + "\n     MESSAGE: '" + message + "'");
        Thread.sleep(250); //simulate some time to insert into the db.
        channel.basicAck(delivery.getEnvelope().getDeliveryTag(), false);
    }
}
}

Code to subscribe only to messageType:1 and re-publish messageType:101

    private final static String EXCHANGE_NAME = "logsTopicDurable";
private final static String QUEUE_NAME = "messageType1";
/**
 * Handler for messageType:1
 */
public static void main(String[] args) throws java.io.IOException, java.lang.InterruptedException {
    ConnectionFactory factory = new ConnectionFactory();
    factory.setHost("192.168.56.101");
    Connection connection = factory.newConnection();
    Channel channel = connection.createChannel();

    channel.exchangeDeclare(EXCHANGE_NAME, "topic", true);
    channel.queueDeclare(QUEUE_NAME, true, false, false, null);

    System.out.println(" [*] listens for messageType:1 and submits messageType:101");

    channel.basicQos(1);

    String routingKey = "#.messageType:1.#".toUpperCase();

    channel.queueBind(QUEUE_NAME, EXCHANGE_NAME, routingKey); //bind to all selected messages
    System.out.println(" [*] subscribing to: " + routingKey);

    System.out.println(" [*] Waiting for messages. To exit press CTRL_C");

    QueueingConsumer consumer = new QueueingConsumer(channel);
    boolean autoAck = false; //ack back when done
    channel.basicConsume(QUEUE_NAME, autoAck, consumer);
    int msgCount = 0;
    while (true) {
        QueueingConsumer.Delivery delivery = consumer.nextDelivery();
        String message = new String(delivery.getBody());

        System.out.println(" [x] Message Count: " + ++msgCount + " ROUTINGKEY: '" + delivery.getEnvelope().getRoutingKey() + "\n     MESSAGE: '" + message + "'");

        channel.basicPublish(EXCHANGE_NAME, 
                delivery.getEnvelope().
                        getRoutingKey().
                        replaceAll("messageType:1", "messageType:101").
                        replaceAll(".FROMDEVICE", ""). 
                        replaceAll("FROMDEVICE.", "").trim(), 
                true, 
                MessageProperties.PERSISTENT_BASIC, 
                message.getBytes());

        channel.basicAck(delivery.getEnvelope().getDeliveryTag(), false);
    }
}

There is publisher code and subscriber code for messageType:101 but I don't think they are needed for this discussion. I've wondered if publishing to a channel that has a queue bound to it might be the cause, but I tried creating two channels (same connection object) and had the same result and a lot uglier code.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would suggest that you are being a bit to liberal with your binding keys. To make things a little more clear you should use the term binding key and routing key differently. The routing key is what is sent by the producer. The binding key is what you use to bind the queue to the topic exchange.

As I cannot be sure which you are referring to when you say

"should match routing key #.MESSAGETYPE:101.#"

are you sending a message with a routing key #.MESSAGETYPE:101.# because that would be a bad idea. I presume not, but if you are don't!

Lets assume then that this is your binding key. I am not sure as I haven't done any testing of this specifically but the # before and after maybe causing some problems. You should think about a specification for your routing keys. Some format that they must conform to. It may be extendable but not completely free. That way you can have much more specific binding keys using * instead of # which will give a little more control.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right, I am mixing my terminology a bit. The routing key on the message is: "FROMDEVICE.MESSAGETYPE:1" and the binding key on the subscription is "#.FROMDEVICE.#". My problem is that the routing key "MESSAGETYPE:101" is somehow matching the binding key "#.FROMDEVICE.#" (in this case I want to take a message with routing key "FROMDEVICE.MESSAGETYPE:1", changing it and re-publish the message with the routing key "MESSAGETYPE:101" without it matching the binding key "#.FROMDEVICE.#"). –  pherris Mar 19 '13 at 13:45
    
have you tried my suggestion? –  robthewolf Mar 19 '13 at 14:50
    
I was curious how this open-match would work too. I'm too early in my POC to know whether or not I will be able to enforce order in the routing key. I simplified my example code by changing the routing keys to always start with FROMDEVICE... (if from the device and not published by another consumer). I also updated the binding key to fromdevice.# to reflect the change. The result was the same - the republished message still is queued for the subscriber which doesnt match the routing key. Could it be how I am using the same channel to consume and publish messages? Or a WSO2 defect? –  pherris Mar 20 '13 at 2:16
    
two suggestions. Are you check/printing/logging the routing key for the code where you receive #.FROMDEVICE.#. I have a feeling that the replace might not be working for some reason. Have you checked that the routing key you are resending with is correct. –  robthewolf Mar 20 '13 at 8:03
    
Yes, I checked both. In the first set of code above - in the while loop I have printed the key I received: System.out.println(" [x] Message Count: " + ++msgCount + " ROUTINGKEY: '" + delivery.getEnvelope().getRoutingKey() + "\n MESSAGE: '" + message + "'");. In the console I can see the routing key that does not match the binding key I used for the "write everything from devices" subscription. –  pherris Mar 20 '13 at 12:01

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