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var keys = [7925181,"68113227"];
var vals = {"7925181":["68113227"],"68113227":["7925181"]};

var temp = [];
for (var i = 0; i < keys.length; i++) {
    temp[keys[i]] = vals[keys[i]];
}
//alert(JSON.stringify(vals).length);
alert(JSON.stringify(temp).length);

When I run that script in Chrome I get, after a good amount of time, an output of 340666156.

My question is... how?

The commented out alert outputs 47. Seems to me that the second alert should yield the same result? That temp should pretty much be an exact copy of val?

The jsfiddle of it:

http://jsfiddle.net/vMMd2/

Oh - and if you want to crash your browser window (well it crashed my Google Chrome window) just add the following to the end:

temp.forEach(function(entry) {
    alert(temp);
});

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
temp.length would be 68113227... –  Passerby Mar 19 '13 at 3:16
    
@Passerby—length is always at least one higher than the highest index, so 681132271 + 1 = 68113228. –  RobG Mar 19 '13 at 4:00
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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted
var keys = [7925181,"68113227"];
var vals = {"7925181":["68113227"],"68113227":["7925181"]};

var temp = {}; //  <--- !!!
for (var i = 0; i < keys.length; i++) {
    temp[keys[i]] = vals[keys[i]];
}
//alert(JSON.stringify(vals).length);
alert(JSON.stringify(temp).length);

http://jsfiddle.net/zerkms/vMMd2/2/

You're creating a sparse array, and presumably V8 initializes all the gaps with some garbage null undefined values (thanks to nnnnnn for checking that). It takes some time

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2  
"initializes all the gaps with some garbage" - JSON.stringify() turns undefined array elements to null, so the output will be [null,null,null,etc...] –  nnnnnn Mar 19 '13 at 3:19
1  
I would not have guessed that. That said it is surprising that it only starts to take time when you do JSON.stringify(). jsfiddle.net/4x597 (without JSON.stringify) takes 0 seconds. With it (jsfiddle.net/4x597/1) takes 39.5 seconds. I guess it's just an interpreter trick - don't initialize an array unless it's actually needed. –  neubert Mar 19 '13 at 3:40
1  
@neubert—the array is initialised when you assign the array literal to temp. You end up with an array with only two members, but length is always set to the highest index plus one, so you have a length of 68113228. JSON doesn't have elisions so it puts null for undefined members. –  RobG Mar 19 '13 at 3:54
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@zerkms, is right. But I also wanted to pointed out why this is happening.

> var temp = [];
> temp[10] = 'test';
> temp 
[ , , , , , , , , , , 'test' ]

As you can see, it creates 9 undefined values. I ran the above with nodejs so the null values are not showing up.

If I did JSON.stringfy() then you would see:

> JSON.stringify(temp)
'[null,null,null,null,null,null,null,null,null,null,"test"]'
share|improve this answer
1  
They're not objects, they're undefined. –  nnnnnn Mar 19 '13 at 3:21
    
Changed to null references. –  Amir Raminfar Mar 19 '13 at 3:23
1  
And they aren't null references either :-S (sorry for being boring) –  zerkms Mar 19 '13 at 3:24
    
Hmmm I think they are. null values, references. All saved as pointer in javascript? No? –  Amir Raminfar Mar 19 '13 at 3:26
2  
Remember that in JS there is a difference between undefined and null. But JSON.stringify() outputs null for undefined array elements, presumably because JSON doesn't have a concept of "undefined". –  nnnnnn Mar 19 '13 at 3:31
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