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I have a database handler class that i use to query a database and return a cursor.

This is the method:

public Cursor getData() {

    String[] columns = new String[] { KEY_ROWID, KEY_NAME, KEY_TEL,
            KEY_EMAIL, KEY_COMMENTS };
    Cursor c = ourDatabase.query(DATABASE_TABLE, columns, null, null, null,
            null, KEY_NAME + " ASC", null);

    if (c != null) {

        c.moveToFirst();
    }

    return c;

As can be seen i set the pointer to the first element in the cursor ready to be returned. I am currently receiving a 'Finalizing a Cursor that has not been deactivated or closed' exception and this is the only cursor I am using where i do not explicitly call .close() on it. My reasons for this is it needs a return type and i cannot close the cursor before returning it as this will set a nullpointer error.

Here is the how the cursor is handled once it is returned:

    DBHandler search = new DBHandler(this, null, null);

    search.open();
    Cursor cursor = search.getData();
    search.close();
    startManagingCursor(cursor);

Can someone point me in the right direction to help close the cursor in my database handler class.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

you have to used this way.

public Cursor getData() {
String[] columns = new String[] { KEY_ROWID, KEY_NAME, KEY_TEL, KEY_EMAIL, KEY_COMMENTS };
     return ourDatabase.query(DATABASE_TABLE, columns, null, null, null,null, KEY_NAME + " ASC", null);
}

Now you have to iterate cursor and when you can done your work then close the cursor.

DBHandler search = new DBHandler(this, null, null);

search.open();
Cursor record = search.getData();    
//startManagingCursor(record);  
if(record.getCount()!=0){
    if(record.moveToFirst()){
        do{

        //your code here.
        }while(record.moveToNext());
    }
}   
record.close();
search.close();

try this.

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Then whatever method is calling getCursor is responsible for closing it. Use Java 7's try-with-resources like so:

try(Cursor c = getData()) {
    // ...
} // closes

Or pass up as high as you need. Somewhere up the call stack needs to be a method responsible for managing the resources of the cursor. This is part of the trade-off of working in a language that leaves as much as possible to the garbage collector, leaving klunky syntax and semantics for when you do need to manage your own resources.

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Downvoter please explain. This answer is correct. –  djechlin May 24 '13 at 16:45

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