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I have a problem with sql statements.

I have three tables: worker, HasSkill and HasTime. HasSkill and HasTime has a foreign key which points to Worker table.

(I made that attribute as a part of primary key, and I also want to constraint the insertion if the w_id does not present in Worker table)

the following is my sql statements. However, the insertion restriction does not work. hope someone can give me some advices. Thanks a lot.

 1 CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS Worker
  2 (
  3 id INTEGER NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  4 name VARCHAR(30), 
  5 email VARCHAR(30), 
  6 address VARCHAR(255), 
  7 hour_rate INTEGER, 
  8 PRIMARY KEY(id)
  9 ); 
 10 
 11 CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS HasSkill
 12 (
 13 w_id INTEGER NOT NULL, 
 14 skill_name VARCHAR(255), 
 15 PRIMARY KEY(w_id, skill_name), 
 16 FOREIGN KEY(w_id) REFERENCES Worker(id) ON DELETE CASCADE
 17 ); 
 18 
 19 CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS HasTime
 20 (
 21 w_id INTEGER NOT NULL, 
 22 day_of_week TINYINT NOT NULL, 
 23 start_time  TIME NOT NULL, 
 24 end_time TIME NOT NULL, 
 25 PRIMARY KEY(w_id, day_of_week, start_time, end_time), 
 26 FOREIGN KEY(w_id) REFERENCES Worker(id) ON DELETE CASCADE
 27 );
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The most common cause of this is that the tables use the MyISAM storage engine. In spite of the declaration of foreign key constraints, MyISAM parses but ignores the constraints, and cannot enforce referential integrity.

Use SHOW TABLE STATUS LIKE 'Has%' and see what the "engine" field reports.


You can specify the storage engine with a table option:

CREATE TABLE HasTime ( . . . ) ENGINE=InnoDB;

The TYPE=InnoDB is outdated syntax. It's recognized for backward compatibility, but the preferred syntax is ENGINE=InnoDB.

As of MySQL 5.5, the default storage engine should be InnoDB, so if you don't specify an engine, tables should be created in InnoDB. It's possible to change this default in the server config file, but it would not be a good idea.

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Thanks for @Bill Karwin.

since I am using mysql.

Add TYPE=InnoDB at end of each create statements.

like these:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS HasTime
(
    w_id INTEGER NOT NULL, 
    day_of_week TINYINT NOT NULL, 
    start_time  TIME NOT NULL, 
    end_time TIME NOT NULL, 
    PRIMARY KEY(w_id, day_of_week, start_time, end_time), 
    FOREIGN KEY(w_id) REFERENCES Worker(id) ON DELETE CASCADE
) TYPE=InnoDB;

refer http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/storage-engines.html

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