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I'm using Ruby's CSV library to parse some CSV. I have a seemingly well-formed CSV file that I created by exporting an Excel file as CSV.

However CSV.open(filename, 'r') causes a CSV::IllegalFormatError.

There are no rogue commas or quotation marks in the file, nor anything else that I can see that might cause problems.

I suspect the problem could be to do with line endings. I am able to parse data entered manually via a text editor (Aquamacs). It is just when I try with data exported from Excel (for OS X) that problems occur. When I open up the exported CSV in vim, all the text appears on one line, with ^M appearing between lines.

From the docs, it seems that you can provide open with a row separator; however I am unsure what it should be in this case.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 34 down vote accepted

Try: CSV.open('filename', 'r', ?,, ?\r)

As cantlin notes, for Ruby 2 it's:

CSV.new('file.csv', 'r', :col_sep => ?,, :row_sep => ?\r)

I'm pretty sure these will DTRT for you. You can also "fix" the file itself (in which case keep the old open) with the following vim command: :%s/\r/\r/g

Yes, I know that command looks like a total no-op, but it will work.

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thanks a lot - wish I could've upvoted you twice for two useful bits of information. –  grifaton Oct 11 '09 at 11:02
    
Can you clarify what ?,, ?\r is doing? Thanks! –  Brian Armstrong Aug 22 '11 at 22:32
    
?x returns the code point for character x, i.e., a number. For some reason, that's what CSV.open expects to see. So we specify the field separator as , and the record separator as the otherwise-troublesome ^M, aka 015, aka 13, aka as CR. BTW, the vim substitute command works because \r means CR in the pattern but NL in the replacement, so it's not actually a no-op. –  DigitalRoss Feb 10 '12 at 4:07
    
Thanks for this, very helpful. Just to note that the CSV constructor signature has changed as of Ruby 1.9.2, usage of the above would be CSV.new('file.csv', 'r', :col_sep => ?,, :row_sep => ?\r). –  cantlin Apr 26 '12 at 16:33
    
Thanks the vim command worked great! –  jspooner Jul 2 '13 at 21:56

Stripping \r characters seemed to work for me

CSV.parse(File.read('filename').gsub(/\r/, ' ')) do |row|
  ...
end
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Another option is to open the CSV file or the original spreadsheet in Excel and save it as "Windows Comma Separated" rather than "Comma Separated Values". This will output the file with line endings that FasterCSV is able to understand.

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Wasted an hour on this one, thanks a ton! –  Joelio Aug 4 '10 at 23:27

""" When I open up the exported CSV in vim, all the text appears on one line, with ^M appearing between lines.

From the docs, it seems that you can provide open with a row separator; however I am unsure what it should be in this case. """

Read back a sentence ... ^M means keyboard Ctrl-M aka '\x0D' (M is the 13th letter of the ASCII alphabet; 0x0D == 13) aka ASCII CR (carriage return) aka '\r' ... IOW what Macs used to use as a line terminator before OS X.

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It seems newer versions of the CSV parser and/or any component it uses read DOS/Windows line endings without issues. Mac OS X's stock one (not sure the version) was not cutting it, installed Ruby 2.0.0 and it parsed the file just fine, without the special arguments...

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I had similar problem. I got an error:

"error_message"=>"Illegal quoting in line 1.", "error_class"=>"CSV::MalformedCSVError"

The problem was the file had Windows line endings, which are of course other than Unix. What helped me was defining row_sep: "\r\n":

CSV.open(path, 'w', headers: :first_row, col_sep: ';', quote_char: '"', row_sep: "\r\n") 
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