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I have a collection in which documents are all in this format:

{"user_id": ObjectId, "book_id": ObjectId}

It represents the relationship between user and book, which is also one-to-many, that means, a user can have more than one books.

Now I got three book_id, for example:

["507f191e810c19729de860ea", "507f191e810c19729de345ez", "507f191e810c19729de860efr"]

I want to query out the users who have these three books, because the result I want is not the document in this collection, but a newly constructed array of user_id, it seems complicated and I have no idea about how to make the query, please help me.

NOTE:

The reason why I didn't use the structure like:

{"user_id": ObjectId, "book_ids": [ObjectId, ...]}

is because in my system, books increase frequently and have no limit in amount, in other words, user may read thousands of books, so I think it's better to use the traditional way to store it.

This question is not restricted by MongoDB, you can answer it in relational database thoughts.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using a regular find you cannot get back all user_id fields who own all the book_id's because you normalized your collection (flattened it).

You can do it, if you use aggregation framework:

db.collection.aggregate([
    {
        $match: {
            book_id: {
                $in: ["507f191e810c19729de860ea",
                      "507f191e810c19729de345ez",
                      "507f191e810c19729de860efr" ]
            }
        }
    },
    {
        $group: {
            _id: "$user_id",
            count: { $sum: 1 }
        }
    },
    {
        $match: {
            count: 3
        }
    },
    {
        $group: {
            _id: null,
            users: { $addToSet: "$_id" }
        }
    }
]);

What this does is filters through the pipeline only for documents which match one of the three book_id values, then it groups by user_id and counts how many matches that user got. If they got three they pass to the next pipeline operation which groups them into an array of user_ids. This solution assumes that each 'user_id,book_id' record can only appear once in the original collection.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you got my idea wrong, I want to find the user who have all three books, not just having one of them. Please reconsider it :) –  Reorx Mar 19 '13 at 11:29
    
changed to match your clarification. –  Asya Kamsky Mar 19 '13 at 16:14

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