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I'm quite new to Haskell, and I ran into this bug when trying to compile Frag.

src/AFRPVectorSpace.hs:51:25:
    Could not deduce (Eq a) arising from a use of `/='
    from the context (VectorSpace v a)
      bound by the class declaration for `VectorSpace'
      at src/AFRPVectorSpace.hs:(32,1)-(53,23)
    Possible fix:
      add (Eq a) to the context of
        the class declaration for `VectorSpace'
    In the expression: nv /= 0
    In the expression:
      if nv /= 0 then v ^/ nv else error "normalize: zero vector"
    In an equation for `normalize':
        normalize v
          = if nv /= 0 then v ^/ nv else error "normalize: zero vector"
          where
              nv = norm v

Relevent code:

class Floating a => VectorSpace v a | v -> a where
    zeroVector   :: v
    (*^)         :: a -> v -> v
    (^/)         :: v -> a -> v
    negateVector :: v -> v
    (^+^)        :: v -> v -> v
    (^-^)        :: v -> v -> v
    dot          :: v -> v -> a
    norm     :: v -> a
    normalize    :: v -> v

    v ^/ a = (1/a) *^ v

    negateVector v = (-1) *^ v

    v1 ^-^ _ = v1 ^+^ v1 -- (negateVector v2)

    norm v = sqrt (v `dot` v)

    normalize v = if nv /= 0 then v ^/ nv else error "normalize: zero vector"
        where
        nv = norm v

My first guess is that I need to add a Deriving Eq or something of that sort, but I'm not sure what exactly I need to do.

share|improve this question
    
I'd argue that you don't really want an Eq constraint for floating types, it's usually somewhat troublesome. I'd rather add class (Num f) => TestZero f where { isZero :: f->Bool }, and then instance (Eq f, Num f) => instance TestZero f where { isZero = (==0) }. –  leftaroundabout Mar 19 '13 at 10:49
    
There is not necessarily a way to convert from 0 into the vector type v. However, changing if nv /= 0 then to if dot v v /= 0 then should do the trick, because a is a numeric type. –  luqui Mar 20 '13 at 13:22

3 Answers 3

I'd guess you'd need to have class (Eq a,Floating a) => VectorSpace v a | v -> a if you want to use /= for a in your default implementations.

Second alternative is to remove normalize from the class and make it an ordinary function instead.

Third alternative is to add the constraint to the type of the normalize, making it Eq a => v -> v.

share|improve this answer
    
Only normalize needs to be removed –  dbaupp Mar 19 '13 at 7:30
    
If you want to keep normalize in the class, you can change its type signature to normalize :: Eq a => v -> v. –  mhwombat Mar 19 '13 at 11:05
    
Edited to include the comments.. –  aleator Mar 19 '13 at 13:55

Prior to ghc 7.4.1, the Num a class had Eq a constraint, so any Num a also had Eq a. Floating a has a constraint Num a, so therefore anything Floating a was also Eq a.

However, this changed with 7.4.1, where the Eq a constraint (as well as the Show a constraint) was removed from the Num class. This is why the code isn't working anymore.

So the solution to the problem is exactly what aleator gave: Add the Eq a constraint explicitly to the VectorSpace class.

Alternatively, you may want to download an older version of ghc (eg 6.8 based on the wiki notes). That version should compile the program without any changes. Then you can update the code to get it working with a newer version of ghc if you so desire.

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This isn't an answer to your question (which has already been answered), but since it's not easy to paste blocks of code into comments, I'll add it as an "answer".

You might prefer to use type families instead of functional dependencies. Type families allow you to do everything you can do with functional dependencies, plus a whole lot more. Here's one way to write your code using type families. It looks very similar to your original code, except that your type variable a has been replaced with a "call" to a type function Metric v (the best name I could think of offhand.)

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies, FlexibleContexts #-}

class Floating (Metric v) => VectorSpace v where
    type Metric v
    zeroVector   :: v
    (*^)         :: Metric v -> v -> v
    (^/)         :: v -> Metric v -> v
    negateVector :: v -> v
    (^+^)        :: v -> v -> v
    (^-^)        :: v -> v -> v
    dot          :: v -> v -> Metric v
    norm     :: v -> Metric v
    normalize    :: Eq (Metric v) => v -> v

    v ^/ a = (1/a) *^ v

    negateVector v = (-1) *^ v

    v1 ^-^ _ = v1 ^+^ v1 -- (negateVector v2)

    norm v = sqrt (v `dot` v)

    normalize v = if nv /= 0 then v ^/ nv else error "normalize: zero vector"
        where
        nv = norm v

Here are some useful links:

share|improve this answer
    
I would call the associated type Scalar (or ScalarOf), I think that's the mathematically more usual way of saying 'the field this vector space is over'. Thanks for the haskell-cafe link, which answered a question about back-and-forth TFs! –  yatima2975 Mar 19 '13 at 12:52

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