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I am working on Java Se 7 OCA and could not figure out why below code does not compile. aMethod call in main method gives compile error stating ambiguous method. Precedence rules between widening and boxing seems to clash in this overloading method sample.

public class Overloading {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    Byte i = 5;
    byte k = 5;
    aMethod(i, k);
}

static void aMethod(byte i, Byte k) {
    System.out.println("Inside 1");
}

static void aMethod(byte i, int k) {
    System.out.println("Inside 2");
}

static void aMethod(Byte i, Byte k) {
    System.out.println("Inside 3 ");
}
}

The error is "The method aMethod(byte, Byte) is ambiguous for the type Overloading". when I comment out first method, it gives same error for second method.

My thinking is: First method needs unboxing and boxing Second method needs unboxing and widening Third method needs only boxing. So it must be third method, since it needs the least conversion and all of them have boxing conversion.

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1  
And the error message was? –  bmargulies Mar 19 '13 at 6:58
    
Why do you think this should compile? –  Jon Skeet Mar 19 '13 at 7:15
    
You can find a proper explanation of the problem here: stackoverflow.com/a/4921807/1065197. Since compiler will go to phase 3, it will find more than a suitable method to use, thus being ambiguous. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jul 9 '13 at 17:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem is with all these methods:

static void aMethod(byte i, Byte k) {
    System.out.println("Inside 1");
}

static void aMethod(byte i, int k) {
    System.out.println("Inside 2");
}

static void aMethod(Byte i, Byte k) {
    System.out.println("Inside 3 ");
}

Java doesn't know, which one it should invoke in line:

    aMethod(i, k);

Your params i and k could be converted by various ways, according to JLS specifications:

i could be unboxed to byte (5.1.8) or leaved as Byte (5.1.1) -> 2 variants

k could be boxed into Byte (5.1.7) or widened to int type (5.1.2) -> 2 variants.

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You are right; but conversion have precedence rules. it will choose widening over boxing. And it must leave "i" as Byte when appropriate than unboxing it. –  isaolmez Mar 19 '13 at 8:07
    
@isaolmez The only one precedence, which will work here, is rule 5.1.1 (conversion type to the same type). In case, when you have not method with appropriate signature (i.e. aMethod(Byte i, byte k)) this precedence has no sense. –  Andremoniy Mar 19 '13 at 8:47

this class you have two equal method

static void aMethod(Byte i, Byte k) {
    System.out.println("Inside 3 ");
}

static void aMethod(byte i, Byte k) {
    System.out.println("Inside 1");
}

Byte automatic conversion byte ,so compile error

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In fact, my call is ambiguous, methods are fine. –  isaolmez Mar 19 '13 at 8:08

Actually not the definition, but the call is ambiguous. since, all the integers in java by default are, int. even if you say byte b =5, 5 would be internally converted to int for any operation. But as the reference is byte, in you case, it has option to call method 2 & 3. So compiler cant understand what to call.

so aMethod(i, (Byte)k) should work.

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I assume you suggested aMethod(i, (int)k). But in this case there are no other options for this call. only integer accepting method is the second one. –  isaolmez Mar 19 '13 at 8:10
    
don't assume. as i said, all integer literals are by default converted to int, be it short, byte, long. so through reference compiler sees byte, but from value it sees an int. Thats y the ambiguity is created. So here, aMethod(i, (byte)k) would work, or else you might need to pass an value of type int. This you can verify by calling aMethod(i, 5) and aMethod(i, (byte)5); –  ay89 Mar 19 '13 at 8:18
    
aMethod(i, (byte)5); did not compile and gave the same error. But if I use aMethod(i, 5), it compiles. –  isaolmez Mar 19 '13 at 8:30
    
oops.... did i write (byte)k.... it should be (Byte)k. As explicit casting and auto-boxing are mutually exclusive. –  ay89 Mar 19 '13 at 8:33

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