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I'm a Python programmer enjoying Go. The thing that trips me up must often is the use of references; I have mastered it (mostly) but then on occasion something baffles me, such as this one.

I have a simple type ('Fixture'):

type Fixture struct {
    Probabilities      *[]float64
}

If I populate the Probabilities field for a single instance of this type, everything is fine:

c := appengine.NewContext(r)
f := Fixture{}
p := []float64{}
p = append(p, 0.5)
p = append(p, 0.2)
p = append(p, 0.3)
f.Probabilities = &p
c.Infof("%v", *f.Probabilities)

2013/03/19 07:37:36 INFO: [0.5 0.2 0.3]

However if I try and populate this field for an array of these types, the code compiles but the field value is always nil:

c := appengine.NewContext(r)
fixtures := []Fixture{}
f := Fixture{}
fixtures = append(fixtures, f)
for _, f := range fixtures {
    p := []float64{}
    p = append(p, 0.5)
    p = append(p, 0.2)
    p = append(p, 0.3)
    f.Probabilities = &p
}
for _, f := range fixtures {
    // c.Infof("%v", *f.Probabilities) // causes error
    c.Infof("%v", f.Probabilities)
}

2013/03/19 07:37:41 INFO: <nil>

I guess I'm not understanding how arrays/slices work, particularly with respect to references. Can anyone point out where I'm going wrong ?

Thanks!

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3  
p.s. there doesn't seem to be a point to your using a pointer to a slice. Just use a slice directly. –  newacct Mar 19 '13 at 8:37
1  
1: You don’t have to use a pointer to a slice here. Slices are references to actual arrays. 2: You’re actual problem (as jnml and PeterSo wrote here) is that f in range is a copy and changing that does not change slice elements. 3: Why not make a function for creating new Fixtures? –  Mostafa Mar 19 '13 at 14:34
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the range statement

for _, f := range fixtures { ... }

f is a newly declared local variable of type Fixture. It's not a reference to anything. So after setting up its values, it has to be put into to the fixtures slice.

package main

import "fmt"

type Fixture struct {
        Probabilities *[]float64
}

func main() {
        fixtures := []Fixture{}
        f := Fixture{}
        fixtures = append(fixtures, f)
        for i, f := range fixtures {
                p := []float64{}
                p = append(p, 0.5)
                p = append(p, 0.2)
                p = append(p, 0.3)
                f.Probabilities = &p
                fixtures[i] = f
        }
        for _, f := range fixtures {
                fmt.Printf("%v", f.Probabilities)
        }
}

(Also here)


Output

&[0.5 0.2 0.3]
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Alternatively, make a slice of pointers []*Fixture so that range will copy the pointer, but it still points to the original slice element. –  Thomas Kappler Mar 19 '13 at 11:15
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Store the element value in the slice. For example,

package main

import "fmt"

type Fixture struct {
    Probabilities *[]float64
}

func main() {
    fixtures := make([]Fixture, 1)
    for i := range fixtures {
        p := []float64{0.5, 0.2, 0.3}
        fixtures[i] = Fixture{Probabilities: &p}
    }
    for _, f := range fixtures {
        fmt.Println(*f.Probabilities)
    }
}

Output:

[0.5 0.2 0.3]
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