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I was searching for a method to set breaks in a plot without using the scale_y_...(breaks=c(x1,x2)) function. The problem is the following: I want some boxplots.

    require(ggplot2)
    a <- rnorm(10, 0, 5)
    a <- as.data.frame(a); colnames(a) <- "test"

    ### original boxplot
    ggplot(data=a, mapping=aes(y=test, x=rep(1,10))) +
      geom_boxplot()

    ### scale_y_continous() cuts of my data points and changes the boxplot!
    ggplot(data=a, mapping=aes(y=test, x=rep(1,10))) +
      geom_boxplot() +
      scale_y_continuous(limits=c(-1,1), breaks=c(-1,0,1))

    ### I am therefore using coord_cartesian() but I am missing a breaks() function
    ggplot(data=a, mapping=aes(y=test, x=rep(1,10))) +
      geom_boxplot() +
      coord_cartesian(ylim = c(-1,1)) # +
    # breaks(c(-1,0,1))   # something like this

Thank you for your help!

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1  
Just curious, why would you want to zoom in on a boxplot? –  Arun Mar 19 '13 at 8:24
    
It's not so much about zooming in but keeping the ylim constant for several boxplots that are plotted side by side. –  Daniel Hoop Mar 19 '13 at 9:17
    
In that case, it is better to use log-scale (or) facet with scales="free". –  Arun Mar 19 '13 at 9:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can combine coord_cartesian() and scale_y_continuous() in one plot, just remove limits=c(-1,1) from scale function. When you use limits= inside the scale function, data are subsetted in that diapason. coord_cartesian() just zooms that region of values.

 ggplot(data=a, mapping=aes(y=test, x=rep(1,10))) +
      geom_boxplot() +
      coord_cartesian(ylim = c(-1,1))+
      scale_y_continuous(breaks=c(-1,0,1))
share|improve this answer
    
Ah! Thank you for this! I was trying to do that in combination with ylim(c(,)) + scale_y_continuous(breaks=c(,)) But then got the error message: Scale for 'y' is already present. Adding another scale for 'y', which will replace the existing scale. Your version works fine! –  Daniel Hoop Mar 19 '13 at 8:42

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