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Sorry I can't really explain in words what I'm tring to do, But..

Say I have the secnario.

public class TestClass
{
}

public class TestClass1 : TestClass, TestInterface<ValueClass1>
{
    public ValueClass1 Property { get; set; }
}

public class TestClass2 : TestClass, TestInterface<ValueClass2>
{
    public ValueClass2 Property { get; set; }
}

public interface TestInterface<T> where T : ValueClass
{
    T Property { get; set; }
}

public class ValueClass
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
}

public class ValueClass2 : ValueClass
{
}

I need to get a value from Property from a list of List<TestClass> which contains both TestClass1 and TestClass2 (and many more), but I cant figure out how to loop though the list and set the Property value.

so here is basically what I am trying to do

List<TestClass> list = new List<TestClass>();

foreach (var item in list.OfType<????>())
{
    item.Property = PropertyManager.GetProperty(item.Property.Id);
}

Edit:

I have many classes that have a common property, but I need the actual Type of that property not the base Type (due to other factors such as serialization), and I need to be able to loop though a list of the main base class and access the property.

Like my example above I only need to get the Id value from the Property.

Currently each class has its own Property and I am using Reflection to do what I need, I was just looking for a cleaner solution.

Edit:

This is my current implementation

public class TestClass
{
}

public class TestClass1 : TestClass
{
    public ValueClass Property { get; set; }
}

public class TestClass2 : TestClass
{
    public ValueClass2 Property { get; set; }
}

public class ValueClass
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
}

public class ValueClass2 : ValueClass
{
}

and to set the values I have to use reflection

List<TestClass> list = new List<TestClass>();

foreach (var item in list.Where(x => x.GetType().GetProperty("Property") != null))
{
    var property = item.GetType().GetProperty("Property");
    property.SetValue(PropertyManager.GetProperty((property.GetValue(item) as ValueClass).Id));
}

And the PropertyManager is just a Dictionary of ValueClass types

public static ValueClass GetProperty(int id)
{
    if (_properties.Containskey(id))
    {
       return _properties[id];
    }
    return null;
}

So what I need is a way to loop though a list of 'TestClass' and populate any derived types that have the ValueClass Property.

At the moment I see Reflection as my only real option.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need the OfType the list is already of type TestClass which exposed Property? –  Bob Vale Mar 19 '13 at 9:09
    
@BobVale, sorry, see my edits, I missed the base class in my example. –  sa_ddam213 Mar 19 '13 at 9:57
    
In your example, what do you expect to happen if you're trying to set a value of type ValueClass to the Property property on an instance of type TypeClass2. This will fail at runtime. –  jam40jeff Mar 19 '13 at 13:30

3 Answers 3

These class relationships are a mess and I guarantee you won't get happy with these inheritance and parameter relations. Can you elaborate what you are trying to do?

Anyway, you have access to Property and Id by:

 static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<TestClass> list = new List<TestClass>();

        foreach (TestClass item in list)
        {
            ValueClass x = item.Property;
            int y = item.Property.Id;
        }
    }

In such scenarios it is often good to avoid var at first, to know what type the variables have.

EDIT
A quick and not too dirty solution is using dynamic.

dynamic d = o; // assign the items in your list to a dynamic variable
var somevar = d.Property;    // access any property you expect x to have.

EDIT The clean solution would be:
1. Define an interface that has all that you want and need in the loop.
2. Attach the interface to the types that shall implement it.

share|improve this answer
1  
While I agree, that really is a comment, not an answer. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 19 '13 at 8:50
    
you are right, i was working on the answer and then stopped at this point. –  citykid Mar 19 '13 at 8:57
    
sorry, I gave a very poor example Of what I am tring to do, I have updated the question, I was missing a whole class, so not all the classes have the Property only some of the derived classes, and I only have a list of the base class –  sa_ddam213 Mar 19 '13 at 9:56
    
@thomas, what are your thoughts on using dynamic vs my current Reflection solution, would dynamic be faster/safer or is it pretty much the same? –  sa_ddam213 Mar 19 '13 at 22:47
    
convenience, less error prone, performance. dynamic is the new escape scenario when class relationships get overly complex (again should not in the normal case). Jon Skeet's "C# in Depth" has on page 415f the longer explanation, which I all subscribe to from my experience. In summary: If nice type safe access is not possible due to language limitations, but dynamic does it, then you face a case to use dynamic in purely managed code. –  citykid Mar 19 '13 at 23:01

you can try:

public class TestClass
{
    public virtual ValueClass Property { get; set; }
}

public class TestClass1 : TestClass
{
    private ValueClass property = null;
    public override ValueClass Property
    {
        get
        {
            return property;
        }
        set
        {
            property = (ValueClass)value;
        }
    }
}

public class TestClass2 : TestClass
{
    private ValueClass2 property = null;
    public override ValueClass Property
    {
        get
        {
            return property;
        }
        set
        {
            property = (ValueClass2)value;
        }
    }
}

public class ValueClass
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
}

public class ValueClass2 : ValueClass
{
}

and:

foreach (var item in list)
        {
            item.Property = PropertyManager.GetProperty(item);
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, but, I'm not keen to add the Property to the base class, also the Property has to be of it Type not the base type, this is due to xaml DataTemplates and XmlSerialization compatability (long story). –  sa_ddam213 Mar 19 '13 at 11:21
public interface IHasProperty {
   ValueClass PropertyAsValueClass { get;set; }
}

public class TestClass<T> : IHasProperty where T : ValueClass
{
   public T Property {get;set;}

   public ValueClass PropertyAsValueClass {
     get { return this.Property; }
     set { this.Property = value as T; }
   }
}

public class TestClass1 : TestClass<ValueClass>
{
}

public class TestClass2 : TestClass<ValueClass2>
{
}

public class ValueClass
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
}

public class ValueClass2 : ValueClass
{
}

You could put extra checking in if you wish...

And then

var list = new List<IHasProperty>();
foreach (var item in list)
{
    item.PropertyAsValueClass = PropertyManager.GetProperty(item.PropertyAsValueClass.Id);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Bob, thanks for the answer, but I can't really just add the property to TestClass, TestClass is used in 1000's of places, I'm starting to think my reflection solution is the only solution :( –  sa_ddam213 Mar 19 '13 at 21:07
    
@sa_ddam213 Can you create a new intermediate class that inherits from testclass and make TestClass1 and TestClass2 inherit from that? –  Bob Vale Mar 19 '13 at 22:34
    
I also thought of that but it messes up the xml serilization, I was hoping to solve this on the class level, but it looks like I will just have to stick with the Reflection solution as it works fine at the moment, but I was just hoping there a cleaner way to do this, thanks for you answers :) –  sa_ddam213 Mar 19 '13 at 22:43
    
What about just implementing the interface in each class and then using list.OfType<IHasProperty>() –  Bob Vale Mar 19 '13 at 22:51

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