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There are many ways to initialize a mock object using MockIto. What is best way among these ?

1.

 public class SampleBaseTestCase {

   @Before public void initMocks() {
       MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(this);
   }

2.

@RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class)

[EDIT] 3.

mock(XXX.class);

suggest me know if any other ways are better than these...

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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

For the mocks initialization, using the runner or the MockitoAnnotations.initMocks are strictly equivalent solutions. From the javadoc of the MockitoJUnitRunner :

JUnit 4.5 runner initializes mocks annotated with Mock, so that explicit usage of MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(Object) is not necessary. Mocks are initialized before each test method.


The first solution (with the MockitoAnnotations.initMocks) could be used when you have already configured a specific runner (SpringJUnit4ClassRunner for example) on your test case.

The second solution (with the MockitoJUnitRunner) is the more classic and my favorite. The code is simpler. Using a runner provides the great advantage of automatic validation of framework usage (described by @David Wallace in this answer).

Both the solutions allows to share the mocks (and spies) between the test methods. Coupled with the @InjectMocks, they allows to write unit tests very quickly. The boilerplate mocking code is reduced, the tests are easier to read. For example :

@RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class)
public class ArticleManagerTest {

    @Mock private ArticleCalculator calculator;
    @Mock(name = "database") private ArticleDatabase dbMock;
    @Spy private UserProvider userProvider = new ConsumerUserProvider();

    @InjectMocks private ArticleManager manager;

    @Test public void shouldDoSomething() {
        manager.initiateArticle();
        verify(database).addListener(any(ArticleListener.class));
    }

    @Test public void shouldDoSomethingElse() {
        manager.finishArticle();
        verify(database).removeListener(any(ArticleListener.class));
    }
}

Pros : The code is minimal

Cons : Black magic. IMO it iss mainly due to the @InjectMocks annotation. With this annotation "you loose the pain of code" (see the great comments of @Brice)


The third solution is to create your mock un each test method. It allow as explained by @mlk in its answer to have "self contained test".

public class ArticleManagerTest {

    @Test public void shouldDoSomething() {
        // given
        ArticleCalculator calculator = mock(ArticleCalculator.class);
        ArticleDatabase database = mock(ArticleDatabase.class);
        UserProvider userProvider = spy(new ConsumerUserProvider());
        ArticleManager manager = new ArticleManager(calculator, 
                                                    userProvider, 
                                                    database);

        // when 
        manager.initiateArticle();

        // then 
        verify(database).addListener(any(ArticleListener.class));
    }

    @Test public void shouldDoSomethingElse() {
        // given
        ArticleCalculator calculator = mock(ArticleCalculator.class);
        ArticleDatabase database = mock(ArticleDatabase.class);
        UserProvider userProvider = spy(new ConsumerUserProvider());
        ArticleManager manager = new ArticleManager(calculator, 
                                                    userProvider, 
                                                    database);

        // when 
        manager.finishArticle();

        // then
        verify(database).removeListener(any(ArticleListener.class));
    }
}

Pros : You clearly demonstrate how the your api works (BDD...)

Cons : there is more boilerplate code. (The mocks creation)


My recommandation is a compromise. Use the @Mock annotation with the @RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class), but do not use the @InjectMocks :

@RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class)
public class ArticleManagerTest {

    @Mock private ArticleCalculator calculator;
    @Mock private ArticleDatabase database;
    @Spy private UserProvider userProvider = new ConsumerUserProvider();

    @Test public void shouldDoSomething() {
        // given
        ArticleManager manager = new ArticleManager(calculator, 
                                                    userProvider, 
                                                    database);

        // when 
        manager.initiateArticle();

        // then 
        verify(database).addListener(any(ArticleListener.class));
    }

    @Test public void shouldDoSomethingElse() {
        // given
        ArticleManager manager = new ArticleManager(calculator, 
                                                    userProvider, 
                                                    database);

        // when 
        manager.finishArticle();

        // then 
        verify(database).removeListener(any(ArticleListener.class));
    }
}

Pros : You clearly demonstrate how the your api works (How my ÀrticleManager` is instantiated). No boilerplate code.

Cons : The test is not self contains, less pain of code

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Is there any added advantage using runner ? –  VinayVeluri Mar 19 '13 at 9:02
    
Updated my answer, i hope it is what you were expecting. –  gontard Mar 19 '13 at 9:53
2  
It is NOT CORRECT that these two are equivalent. It is NOT TRUE that simpler code is the only advantage to using MockitoJUnitRunner. For more information about the differences, see the question at stackoverflow.com/questions/10806345/… and my answer to it. –  David Wallace Mar 19 '13 at 13:02
1  
@Gontard Yeah sure dependencies are visible, but I've seen code gone wrong using this approach. About using the Collaborator collab = mock(Collaborator.class), in my opinion this way is certainly a valid approach. While this might tend to be verbose, you can gain in understandability and refactorability of the tests. Both ways have their pros and cons, I've not yet decided which approach is better. Amyway it's always possible to write crap, and probably depends on the context and the coder. –  Brice Mar 19 '13 at 15:15
1  
@mlk i am totally agree with you. My english is not very good and it lacks nuances. My point was to insist on the UNIT word. –  gontard Mar 20 '13 at 9:50
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MockitoAnnotations & the runner have been well discussed above, so I'm going to throw in my tuppence for the unloved:

XXX mockedXxx = mock(XXX.class);

I use this because I find it a little bit more descriptive and I prefer (not out right ban) unit tests not to use member variables as I like my tests to be (as much as they can be) self contained.

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Is there any other advantage over using mock(XX.class) except making the test case to be self contained ? –  VinayVeluri Mar 19 '13 at 12:43
    
Not as far as I am aware. –  mlk Mar 19 '13 at 14:12
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There is a neat way of doing this.

  • If it's an Unit Test you can do this:

    @RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class)
    public class MyUnitTest {
    
        @Mock
        private MyFirstMock myFirstMock;
    
        @Mock
        private MySecondMock mySecondMock;
    
        @Spy
        private MySpiedClass mySpiedClass = new MySpiedClass();
    
        // It's gonna inject the 2 mocks and the spied object per reflection to this object
        // The java doc of @InjectMocks explains it really well how and when it does the injection
        @InjectMocks
        private MyClassToTest myClassToTest;
    
        @Test
        public void testSomething() {
        }
    }
    
  • EDIT: If it's an Integration test you can do this(not intended to be used that way with Spring. Just showcase that you can initialize mocks with diferent Runners):

    @RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
    @ContextConfiguration("aplicationContext.xml")
    public class MyIntegrationTest {
    
        @Mock
        private MyFirstMock myFirstMock;
    
        @Mock
        private MySecondMock mySecondMock;
    
        @Spy
        private MySpiedClass mySpiedClass = new MySpiedClass();
    
        // It's gonna inject the 2 mocks and the spied object per reflection to this object
        // The java doc of @InjectMocks explains it really well how and when it does the injection
        @InjectMocks
        private MyClassToTest myClassToTest;
    
        @Before
        public void setUp() throws Exception {
              MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(this);
        }
    
        @Test
        public void testSomething() {
        }
    }
    
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If MOCK is involved in Integration tests also, will it makes sense ? –  VinayVeluri Mar 19 '13 at 12:42
    
actually it won't, your right. I just wanted to show to possibilities of Mockito. For instance if your use RESTFuse you have to user their runner so you can initialize mocks with MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(this); –  emd Mar 19 '13 at 12:48
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