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I am assisting in a database upgrade from MySQL 4 to MySQL 5.5. My client's application server has also been upgraded from JDK 5 to JDK 7. The application runs however throws lots of exceptions when executing database operations.

I discovered that the upgraded database uses a mixture of Latin1 generic, Latin1 Swedish and UTF8 generic in table collation and/or table column collation, thus most JOIN queries failed.

There are hundreds of tables and thousands of table fields, it will be very difficult to manually convert all of them.

Is there a more convenient way to convert all data tables and all columns into same collation?

Thank you.

Edit: SQLException message example showing that JOIN queries failed:

"Illegal mix of collations (latin1_general_ci,IMPLICIT) and (utf8_general_ci,COERCIBLE) for operation '='"

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Are you sure the character sets are the cause of the JOIN query to fail? - Can you give an example of this as this shouldn't happen. –  Steve Mar 19 '13 at 9:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A mixture of character sets shouldn't cause queries to fail, as MySQL should convert between character sets as required.

However, as documented under ALTER TABLE Syntax:

To change the table default character set and all character columns (CHAR, VARCHAR, TEXT) to a new character set, use a statement like this:

ALTER TABLE tbl_name CONVERT TO CHARACTER SET charset_name;

For a column that has a data type of VARCHAR or one of the TEXT types, CONVERT TO CHARACTER SET will change the data type as necessary to ensure that the new column is long enough to store as many characters as the original column. For example, a TEXT column has two length bytes, which store the byte-length of values in the column, up to a maximum of 65,535. For a latin1 TEXT column, each character requires a single byte, so the column can store up to 65,535 characters. If the column is converted to utf8, each character might require up to three bytes, for a maximum possible length of 3 × 65,535 = 196,605 bytes. That length will not fit in a TEXT column's length bytes, so MySQL will convert the data type to MEDIUMTEXT, which is the smallest string type for which the length bytes can record a value of 196,605. Similarly, a VARCHAR column might be converted to MEDIUMTEXT.

To avoid data type changes of the type just described, do not use CONVERT TO CHARACTER SET. Instead, use MODIFY to change individual columns. For example:

ALTER TABLE t MODIFY latin1_text_col TEXT CHARACTER SET utf8;
ALTER TABLE t MODIFY latin1_varchar_col VARCHAR(M) CHARACTER SET utf8;

If you specify CONVERT TO CHARACTER SET binary, the CHAR, VARCHAR, and TEXT columns are converted to their corresponding binary string types (BINARY, VARBINARY, BLOB). This means that the columns no longer will have a character set and a subsequent CONVERT TO operation will not apply to them.

If charset_name is DEFAULT, the database character set is used.

 Warning 

The CONVERT TO operation converts column values between the character sets. This is not what you want if you have a column in one character set (like latin1) but the stored values actually use some other, incompatible character set (like utf8). In this case, you have to do the following for each such column:

ALTER TABLE t1 CHANGE c1 c1 BLOB;
ALTER TABLE t1 CHANGE c1 c1 TEXT CHARACTER SET utf8;

The reason this works is that there is no conversion when you convert to or from BLOB columns.

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