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I need to increment a counter until it reaches a particular number. I can use two parallel task to increment the number. Instead of using a lock to check if the number has not reach the maximum allowed value and then incrementing, I thought using Interlocked.CompareExchange in the following manner:

public class CompareExchangeStrategy
{
  private int _counter = 0;
   private int _max;

public CompareExchangeStrategy(int max)
{
    _max = max;
}

public void Increment()
{
    Task task1 = new Task(new Action(DoWork));
    Task task2 = new Task(new Action(DoWork));
    task1.Start();
    task2.Start();
    Task[] tasks = new Task[2] { task1, task2 };
    Task.WaitAll(tasks);

}

private void DoWork()
{
    while (true)
    {
        int initial = _counter;
        if (initial >= _max)
        {
            break;
        }
        int computed = initial + 1;
        Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _counter, computed, initial);
    }
}

 }

This code is taking more to execute (for _max= 1,000,000) than the lock approach:

public class LockStrategy
{
    private int _counter = 0;
    private int _max;

    public LockStrategy(int max)
    {
        _max = max;
    }

    public void Increment()
    {
        Task task1 = new Task(new Action(DoWork));
        Task task2 = new Task(new Action(DoWork));
        task1.Start();
        task2.Start();
        Task[] tasks = new Task[2] { task1, task2 };
        Task.WaitAll(tasks);

    }

    private void DoWork()
    {
        while (true)
            {
                lock (_lockObject)
                {
                    if (_counter < _max)
                    {
                        _counter++;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
    }

   }

There might be a problem with the way I am using Interlocked.CompareExchange but I have not been able to figure out. Is there a better way to perform the above logic without using lock (aka Interlocked methods)?


Update
I was able to come with a version which performs as good as the lock version (for iterations = 1,000,000 and better for > 1,000,000 iterations).

    SpinWait spinwait = new SpinWait();
    int lock =0;
                while(true)
                {

                    if (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref lock, 1, 0) != 1)
                    {

                        if (_counter < _max)
                        {
                            _counter++;
                            Interlocked.Exchange(ref lock, 0);
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            Interlocked.Exchange(ref lock, 0);
                            break;
                        }

                    }
                    else
                    {
                        spinwait.SpinOnce();
                    }
                }


The difference is made by the spin. If the task is unable to increment the variable on first go it spins providing an opportunity for task 2 to progress further instead of performing a busy spin wait.

I suspect lock pretty much does the same, it could employ a strategy to spin and allow the thread currently owning the lock to execute.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

The problem here is that you are actually doing a lot more work in the Interlocked version - by which I mean more iterations. This is because a lot of the time the CompareExchange isn't doing anything, because the value was changed by the other thread. You can see this by adding a total to each loop:

    int total = 0;
    while (true)
    {
        int initial = Thread.VolatileRead(ref _counter);
        if (initial >= _max)
        {
            break;
        }
        int computed = initial + 1;
        Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _counter, computed, initial);
        total++;
    }
    Console.WriteLine(total);

(note I also added a VolatileRead to ensure _counter isn't held in a register)

I get much more than iterations (via total) thatn you might expect here. The point is that when using Interlocked in this way, you need to add a strategy for what happens if the value changed, i.e. a retry strategy.

For example, a crude retry strategy might be:

    while (true)
    {
        int initial = Thread.VolatileRead(ref _counter);
        if (initial >= _max)
        {
            break;
        }
        int computed = initial + 1;
        if (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _counter, computed, initial)
                          != initial) continue;
        total++;
    }

which is to say: keep retrying until you make it work - any "doing" code would only happen after that check (where the total++ line is currently). This, however, makes the code more expensive.

If lock is cheaper: use lock. There's nothing wrong with lock, and indeed it is very optimized internally. Lock-free is not automatically the same as "fastest" or indeed "simplest".

share|improve this answer
    
@Ngm define "better" ;p By all accounts, it sounds like your LockStrategy already meets that requirement... –  Marc Gravell Mar 19 '13 at 9:48
    
Agree with the reasoning and the approach. But is there a way to make this code lock free (using atomic operations) and make it faster than lock? By "better" I mean better performing than the lock version :-) –  Ngm Mar 19 '13 at 9:50
    
@Ngm locks are insanely cheap when they are not contested. How congested and contested do you expect this to be in your real code? –  Marc Gravell Mar 19 '13 at 9:51
1  
@Ngm in particular, this test is catastrophic for Interlocked: there is no "real work" happening at any time, so at all points in the test the code each thread is mutating the value of _counter. This is actually the pathological worst-edge-case for showing CompareExchangeStrategy. For this code to be even remotely fair to CompareExchangeStrategy, there should be some other non-trivial work... IMO. –  Marc Gravell Mar 19 '13 at 9:53
    
This was a basic test as part of bigger scope. the real code will not have the same logic, but yes it could have contention among threads. –  Ngm Mar 19 '13 at 9:54

I've managed to achieve almost the same performance as lockstrategy using the following code:

public class CompareExchangeStrategy {
        volatile private int _counter = 0;
        private int _max;

        public CompareExchangeStrategy(int max) {
            _max = max;
        }

        public void Increment() {
            Task task1 = new Task(new Action(DoWork));
            Task task2 = new Task(new Action(DoWork));
            task1.Start();
            task2.Start();
            Task[] tasks = new Task[2] { task1, task2 };
            Task.WaitAll(tasks);

        }

        private void DoWork() {
            while(true) {
                if(Interlocked.Add(ref _counter, 1) >= _max)
                    break;
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
The check for > _max is not atomic? all though the add operation is atomic. So you could end up with a 1,000,001? –  Ngm Mar 19 '13 at 9:58
    
minor note; Interlocked.Increment is probably more idiomatic than Interlocked.Add(..., 1); but indeed, this doesn't address the "one too many" issue (or even a few too many, if using > 2 threads). –  Marc Gravell Mar 19 '13 at 10:00
    
Yes, it ends up with 1000001. I just wanted to speed up the interlocked approach as much as possible. I did not find a way to make it work faster. –  platon Mar 19 '13 at 10:02
    
(changing the > for >= doesn't remove the thread-race condition, btw; it may not exhibit it every time, but it is possible to end up with the 1,000,001 even with the >=) –  Marc Gravell Mar 19 '13 at 10:07
    
yes, i looked at the original code and changed mine according to it. It usually ends up with 1000001 because two tasks working and there is no the condition before changing the value. –  platon Mar 19 '13 at 10:11

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