Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using this trigger in order to fill in the CreatedDate and LastUpdated columns (of type datetime) in a table:

CREATE TRIGGER trCreatedDate ON [LasMTest]
FOR INSERT 
AS
    UPDATE [LasMTest] 
    SET [LasMTest].Created = getdate(),
        [LasMTest].LastModified = getdate()
    FROM [LasMTest] 
    INNER JOIN Inserted ON [LasMTest].[ID] = Inserted.[ID]
GO

When I check the table, the dates are off by just a fraction of a second.

Created LastModified    ID
2013-03-19 09:24:32.920 2013-03-19 09:24:32.930 4
2013-03-19 09:26:39.890 2013-03-19 09:26:39.900 5

How can I modify the trigger so that they are both the exact time?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's the interaction of your two triggers that's causing the problem.

If, instead, you set both columns to default to getdate() and ditch your insert trigger, it should work - the INSERT won't also cause an UPDATE.

The alternative is to author your INSERT trigger as an INSTEAD OF trigger that performs an INSERT rather than an UPDATE (and thus, also, avoids the UPDATE trigger firing).


If you do want to write it as an INSTEAD OF trigger, it would be something like:

CREATE TRIGGER trCreatedDate ON [LasMTest]
INSTEAD OF INSERT 
AS
    INSERT INTO LasMTest (/* Column List */,Created,LastModified)
    SELECT /* Column List */,getdate(),getdate() from inserted
GO

INSERTs into the triggering table in an INSTEAD OF trigger don't (thankfully) cause the trigger to be fired recursively. If ID is an IDENTITY column, then it should appear in the column lists above (it hasn't been generated yet).

share|improve this answer
    
what is the syntax for the INSTEAD OF? –  sd_dracula Mar 19 '13 at 9:43
    
The default constraint for Created and delete the insert trigger worked just fine. thanks –  sd_dracula Mar 19 '13 at 10:04

Try this:

CREATE TRIGGER trCreatedDate ON [LasMTest]

FOR INSERT 

AS
Declare @CurrentDate Datetime
Set @CurrentDate=getdate()
UPDATE [LasMTest] SET [LasMTest].Created=@CurrentDate,[LasMTest].LastModified=@CurrentDate

FROM [LasMTest] INNER JOIN Inserted ON [LasMTest].[ID]= Inserted.[ID]

GO
share|improve this answer
    
I have tried that too, doesn't quite work, probably because I have another trigger for UPDATE which I think is the cause of the discrepancy. CREATE TRIGGER trLastModifiedDate ON [LasMTest] FOR UPDATE AS UPDATE [LasMTest] SET [LasMTest].LastModified=getdate() FROM [LasMTest] INNER JOIN Inserted ON [LasMTest].[ID]= Inserted.[ID] basically it seems that actually triggers when I do INSERT which I want it to trigger only when a row is UPDATED, not created, how to change that? –  sd_dracula Mar 19 '13 at 9:37

You basically want to avoid the UPDATE trigger when doing the update from INSERT. This is called Nested Triggers. One easy solution is to use CONTEXT_INFO() to communicate to the nested UPDATE trigger code that you are already in an INSERT trigger so it suppresses itself:

CREATE TRIGGER trCreatedDate ON [LasMTest]
FOR INSERT 
AS
    SET CONTEXT_INFO 0xDEADBEEF;
    UPDATE [LasMTest] 
    SET [LasMTest].Created = getdate(),
        [LasMTest].LastModified = getdate()
    FROM [LasMTest] 
    INNER JOIN Inserted ON [LasMTest].[ID] = Inserted.[ID];
    SET CONTEXT_INFO NULL;
GO

CREATE TRIGGER trModifiedDate ON [LasMTest]
FOR UPDATE
AS
    DECLARE @context varbinary(128);
    SET @context = CONTEXT_INFO();
    IF @context is NULL
    BEGIN
       UPDATE [LasMTest] 
          SET [LasMTest].LastModified = getdate()
        FROM [LasMTest] 
        INNER JOIN Inserted ON [LasMTest].[ID] = Inserted.[ID];
    END
GO

However such an approach is fragile. An exception can leave the context_info set and suppress all subsequent UPDATE triggers in the session. This requires adding TRY/CATCH blocks. And you always run the risk of an application using CONTEXT_INFO for its own purposes and ruining your scheme.

Another solution is to make the UPDATE trigger smart. It can check the UPDATE(Created) inside the UPDATE trigger and suppress any action if the Created column was modified. This works by convention, because you know that the only place that updates the Created column is the INSERT trigger:

CREATE TRIGGER trModifiedDate ON [LasMTest]
FOR UPDATE
AS
    IF NOT UPDATE(Created)
    BEGIN
       UPDATE [LasMTest] 
          SET [LasMTest].LastModified = getdate()
        FROM [LasMTest] 
        INNER JOIN Inserted ON [LasMTest].[ID] = Inserted.[ID];
    END
GO
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.