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What would be the best space and time efficient solution to find the first non repeating character for a string like aabccbdcbe?

The answer here is d. So the point that strikes me is that it can be done in two ways:

  1. For every index i loop i-1 times and check if that character occurs ever again. But this is not efficient: growth of this method is O(N^2) where N is the length of the string.
  2. Another possible good way could be if I could form a tree or any other ds such that I could order the character based on the weights (the occurrence count). This could take me just one loop of length N through the string to form the structure. That is just O(N) + O(time to build tree or any ds).
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marked as duplicate by casperOne Mar 20 '13 at 12:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Do you know anything about the types of inputs you'll be getting? That would be useful in determining which algorithm is better. –  Aaron Dufour Mar 19 '13 at 17:17
    
i dont know anything more than what i have shared here .. it is actually an interview question i found online –  Sandy Mar 19 '13 at 17:21
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7 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's a very straightforward O(n) solution:

def fn(s):
  order = []
  counts = {}
  for x in s:
    if x in counts:
      counts[x] += 1
    else:
      counts[x] = 1 
      order.append(x)
  for x in order:
    if counts[x] == 1:
      return x
  return None

We loop through the string once. When we come across a new character, we store it in counts with a value of 1, and append it to order. When we come across a character we've seen before, we increment its value in counts. Finally, we loop through order until we find a character with a value of 1 in counts and return it.

share|improve this answer
    
turned out to be performing good but the list comprehension and string replacing method still wins –  Sandy Mar 19 '13 at 18:03
1  
@Sandy That's why I was asking about the dataset. You're going to find that that method is O(n^2) in the worst case, so for large strings with the answer near the end, it is going to perform pretty poorly, whereas mine is O(n) (albeit with a larger constant). –  Aaron Dufour Mar 19 '13 at 18:10
    
u are right i missed it -> even the string replacing is going to worst case running time of O(n^2) like list comprehension for large strings –  Sandy Mar 19 '13 at 18:37
    
This wins for example with s = 2 * string.printable + '\0' –  Janne Karila Mar 20 '13 at 8:21
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I think that removing of the repeating characters from the string may significantly reduce the number of operations. For example:

s = "aabccbdcbe"
while s != "":
    slen0 = len(s)
    ch = s[0]
    s = s.replace(ch, "")
    slen1 = len(s)
    if slen1 == slen0-1:
        print ch
        break;
else:
    print "No answer"
share|improve this answer
    
This may not be a good option since u are not replacing characters in string u are creating new strings which is an expensive operation –  Sandy Mar 19 '13 at 14:29
    
+1 I'm happy to be the first one to upvote one of your answer on SO, Roman. If I didn't do error in my benchmarking, your solution is the fastest of all I tested in a benchmarking. See the edit in my answer. –  eyquem Mar 19 '13 at 14:52
1  
@Sandy I was having the same conviction. But the benchmarking of this solution declared it is the best one ! I don't understand why. In my code I let the instruction srf = s[:] (which is necessary if we don't want the original string to be modified) outside of the timing block. But even if this instruction is pushed into the block, the time remains the least of all execution times –  eyquem Mar 19 '13 at 15:00
1  
@eyquem Thank you very much for detailed analysis of the proposed solutions. I think it is very useful. Actually I was surprised by the results. Concerning the tests results I may suppose that my solution works fast because a) creation of the new string is about O(N) operations, b) the string length is reduced (in some cases significantly) at every step, and c) in most cases algorithm stops before processing all the string. –  Roman Fursenko Mar 19 '13 at 16:58
    
good thought @RomanFursenko –  Sandy Mar 19 '13 at 17:23
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The speed of the search depends on several factors:

  • the length of the string
  • the position before which there is not a one-time-occuring character
  • the size of the string after this position
  • the number of different characters occuring in the string

.

In the following code, I firstly define a string s
with the help of random.choice() and the a group of one-time-occurring characters named unik ,
from two strings s1 and s2 that I concatenate : s1 + s2
where:

  • s1 is a string of length nwo in which there is NOT ANY one-time-occurring character
  • s2 is a string of length nwi in which THERE IS one-time-occurring characters

.

#### creation of s from s1 and s2 #########

from random import choice

def without(u,n):
    letters = list('abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz')
    for i in xrange(n):
        c = choice(letters)
        if c not in unik:
            yield c

def with_un(u,n):
    letters = list('abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz')
    ecr = []
    for i in xrange(n):
        c = choice(letters)
        #ecr.append('%d %s  len(letters) == %d' % (i,c,len(letters)))
        yield c
        if c in unik:
            letters.remove(c)
    #print '\n'.join(ecr)

unik = 'ekprw'
nwo,nwi = 0,500
s1 = ''.join(c for c in without(unik,nwo))
s2 = ''.join(c for c in with_un(unik,nwi))
s = s1 + s2

if s1:
    print '%-27ss2 : %d chars' % ('s1 : %d chars' % len(s1),len(s2))
    for el in 'ekprw':
        print ('s1.count(%s) == %-12ds2.count(%s) == %d'
               % (el,s1.count(el),el,s2.count(el)))
    others = [c for c in 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz' if c not in unik]
    print 's1.count(others)>1 %s' % all(s1.count(c)>1 for c in others)
else:
    print "s1 == ''     len(s2) == %d" % len(s2)
    for el in 'ekprw':
        print ('   -         s2.count(%s) == %d'
               % (el,s2.count(el)))
print 'len of s  == %d\n' % len(s)

Then there is the benchmarking.
Varying the numbers nwo and nwi we see the influence on the speed:

### benchmark of three solutions #################

from time import clock


# Janne Karila
from collections import Counter, OrderedDict
class OrderedCounter(Counter, OrderedDict):
    pass
te = clock()
c = OrderedCounter(s)
rjk = (item for item, count in c.iteritems() if count == 1).next()
tf = clock()-te
print 'Janne Karila  %.5f    found: %s' % (tf,rjk)

# eyquem
te = clock()
candidates = set(s)
li = []
for x in s:
    if x in candidates:
        li.append(x)
        candidates.remove(x)
    elif x in li:
        li.remove(x)
rey = li[0]
tf = clock()-te
print 'eyquem        %.5f    found: %s' % (tf,rey)

# TyrantWave
te = clock()
rty = (a for a in s if s.count(a) == 1).next()
tf = clock()-te
print 'TyrantWave    %.5f    found: %s' % (tf,rty)

.

Some results

With s1 of null length, nwo = 0 and nwi = 50:

s1 == ''     len(s2) == 50
   -         s2.count(e) == 1
   -         s2.count(k) == 1
   -         s2.count(p) == 1
   -         s2.count(r) == 1
   -         s2.count(w) == 1
len of s  == 50

Janne Karila  0.00077    found: e
eyquem        0.00013    found: e
TyrantWave    0.00005    found: e

TyrantWave's solutions is the faster because the first one-occurring-char is found rapidly in the first positions of the string

.

With nwo = 300 and nwi = 50
(hereafter 401 chars for s1 because occurrences of one-time-occurring chars weren't retained during construct of s1, see function without() )

s1 : 245 chars             s2 : 50 chars
s1.count(e) == 0           s2.count(e) == 1
s1.count(k) == 0           s2.count(k) == 1
s1.count(p) == 0           s2.count(p) == 1
s1.count(r) == 0           s2.count(r) == 1
s1.count(w) == 0           s2.count(w) == 1
s1.count(others)>1 True
len of s  == 295

Janne Karila  0.00167    found: e
eyquem        0.00030    found: e
TyrantWave    0.00042    found: e

This time TyrantWave's solution is longer than mine because it has to count occurrences of all the characters in the first part of s that is to say in s1 in which there are no one-time-occurring characters (they are in the second part s2)
However, to obtain a more short time with my solution, nwo needs to be notably greater than nwi

.

With nwo = 300 and nwi = 5000

s1 : 240 chars             s2 : 5000 chars
s1.count(e) == 0           s2.count(e) == 1
s1.count(k) == 0           s2.count(k) == 1
s1.count(p) == 0           s2.count(p) == 1
s1.count(r) == 0           s2.count(r) == 1
s1.count(w) == 0           s2.count(w) == 1
s1.count(others)>1 True
len of s  == 5240

Janne Karila  0.01510    found: p
eyquem        0.00534    found: p
TyrantWave    0.00294    found: p

If length of s2 is raised, then TyrantWave's solution is better again.

.

Conclude what you want

.

EDIT

Terrific idea of Roman !
I added the solution of Roman in my benchmarking, and it won !

I also did some tiny modifications that improve his solution.

# Roman Fursenko
srf = s[:]
te = clock()
while srf != "":
    slen0 = len(srf)
    ch = srf[0]
    srf = srf.replace(ch, "")
    slen1 = len(srf)
    if slen1 == slen0-1:
        rrf = ch
        break
else:
    rrf = "No answer"
tf = clock()-te
print 'Roman Fursenko %.6f    found: %s' % (tf,rrf)

# Roman Fursenko improved
srf = s[:]
te = clock()
while not(srf is ""):
    slen0 = len(srf)
    srf = srf.replace(srf[0], "")
    if len(srf) == slen0-1:
        rrf = ch
        break
else:
    rrf = "No answer"
tf = clock()-te
print 'Roman improved %.6f    found: %s' % (tf,rrf)

print '\nindex of %s in the string :  %d' % (rty,s.index(rrf))

.

The results are:

.

s1 == ''     len(s2) == 50
   -         s2.count(e) == 1
   -         s2.count(k) == 1
   -         s2.count(p) == 1
   -         s2.count(r) == 1
   -         s2.count(w) == 1
len of s  == 50

Janne Karila   0.0032538    found: r
eyquem         0.0001249    found: r
TyrantWave     0.0000534    found: r
Roman Fursenko 0.0000299    found: r
Roman improved 0.0000263    found: r

index of r in the string :  1

s1 == ''     len(s2) == 50
   -         s2.count(e) == 1
   -         s2.count(k) == 0
   -         s2.count(p) == 1
   -         s2.count(r) == 1
   -         s2.count(w) == 1
len of s  == 50

Janne Karila   0.0008183    found: a
eyquem         0.0001285    found: a
TyrantWave     0.0000550    found: a
Roman Fursenko 0.0000433    found: a
Roman improved 0.0000391    found: a

index of a in the string :  4

>

s1 : 240 chars             s2 : 50 chars
s1.count(e) == 0           s2.count(e) == 1
s1.count(k) == 0           s2.count(k) == 0
s1.count(p) == 0           s2.count(p) == 1
s1.count(r) == 0           s2.count(r) == 1
s1.count(w) == 0           s2.count(w) == 1
s1.count(others)>1 True
len of s  == 290

Janne Karila   0.0016390    found: e
eyquem         0.0002956    found: e
TyrantWave     0.0004112    found: e
Roman Fursenko 0.0001428    found: e
Roman improved 0.0001277    found: e

index of e in the string :  242

s1 : 241 chars             s2 : 5000 chars
s1.count(e) == 0           s2.count(e) == 1
s1.count(k) == 0           s2.count(k) == 1
s1.count(p) == 0           s2.count(p) == 1
s1.count(r) == 0           s2.count(r) == 1
s1.count(w) == 0           s2.count(w) == 1
s1.count(others)>1 True
len of s  == 5241

Janne Karila   0.0148231    found: r
eyquem         0.0053283    found: r
TyrantWave     0.0030166    found: r
Roman Fursenko 0.0007414    found: r
Roman improved 0.0007230    found: r

index of r in the string :  250

I've learned something thanks to the code of Roman:
s.replace() creates a new string and I thought that, because of that, it was a slow method.
But, I don't know for which reason, it is a really fast method.

.

EDIT 2

The Oin's solution is worst:

# Oin
from operator import itemgetter
seen = set()
only_appear_once = dict()
te = clock()
for i, x in enumerate(s):
  if x in seen and x in only_appear_once:
    only_appear_once.pop(x)
  else:
    seen.add(x)
    only_appear_once[x] = i
  fco = min(only_appear_once.items(),key=itemgetter(1))[0]
tf = clock()-te
print 'Oin            %.7f    found: %s' % (tf,fco)

results

s1 == ''     len(s2) == 50
Oin            0.0007124    found: e
Janne Karila   0.0008057    found: e
eyquem         0.0001252    found: e
TyrantWave     0.0000712    found: e
Roman Fursenko 0.0000335    found: e
Roman improved 0.0000335    found: e

index of e in the string :  2


s1 : 237 chars             s2 : 50 chars
Oin            0.0029783    found: k
Janne Karila   0.0014714    found: k
eyquem         0.0002889    found: k
TyrantWave     0.0005598    found: k
Roman Fursenko 0.0001458    found: k
Roman improved 0.0001372    found: k

index of k in the string :  246


s1 : 236 chars             s2 : 5000 chars
Oin            0.0801739    found: e
Janne Karila   0.0155715    found: e
eyquem         0.0044623    found: e
TyrantWave     0.0027548    found: e
Roman Fursenko 0.0007255    found: e
Roman improved 0.0007199    found: e

index of e in the string :  244
share|improve this answer
    
Great benchmarking there! Seems that yours and my solutions aren't too much different - depends on how fast it will find the repeating char. –  TyrantWave Mar 19 '13 at 13:50
    
I think that my solution is faster in less probable cases. I think yours gives the result very much more rapidly in the majority of encountered cases. 534 is 82 % longer than 294 for example, and 13 is 160 % longer than 5 !! –  eyquem Mar 19 '13 at 13:54
    
Hey great benchmarking really :) but i guess the slowness in your code is also because of this elif x in li which is of the O(N) there by giving your whole code O(N^2) but since TyrantWave's solution uses list comprehension it keeps whole data in memory due to which it turns out to be faster than your's although TyrantWave also grows at O(N^2) .. but on the long run i guess using sets and dicts like @Oin's solution is going to perform better, where it is possible to attain O(N) with single loop and O(1) with set and dict access.. what do u ppl say? –  Sandy Mar 19 '13 at 14:20
    
@TyrantWave Your solution is beaten by the one of Roman Fursenko ! See my edit –  eyquem Mar 19 '13 at 14:43
    
@Sandy See my edit concerning the solution of Roman Fursenko, please –  eyquem Mar 19 '13 at 16:09
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A list comprehension will give you the characters in the order they appear if they only appear once:

In [61]: s = 'aabccbdcbe'

In [62]: [a for a in s if s.count(a) == 1]
Out[62]: ['d', 'e']

Then just return the first entry of this:

In [63]: [a for a in s if s.count(a) == 1][0]
Out[63]: 'd'

If you just need the first entry, a generator would work as well:

In [69]: (a for a in s if s.count(a) == 1).next()
Out[69]: 'd'
share|improve this answer
    
You don't need a list; you can do (a for a in s if s.count(a) == 1).next() –  Burhan Khalid Mar 19 '13 at 9:44
1  
This is also O(N²) since count is O(N), though I would claim that you can't do any better ... –  filmor Mar 19 '13 at 9:44
    
True, a generator would work as well. I'll add it in. –  TyrantWave Mar 19 '13 at 9:47
    
Thanks tryantwave for the solution but I was wondering how is the count method implemented coz internally if it loops i times then again the growth of program is O(N^2) what do u say? –  Sandy Mar 19 '13 at 9:48
    
@Sandy I can confirm that the count method does loop through to count. –  jamylak Mar 19 '13 at 12:35
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collections.Counter counts efficiently(*) and collections.OrderedDict remembers the order in which items were first seen. Let's use multiple inheritance to combine the benefits:

from collections import Counter, OrderedDict

class OrderedCounter(Counter, OrderedDict):
    pass

def first_unique(iterable):
    c = OrderedCounter(iterable)
    for item, count in c.iteritems():
        if count == 1:
            return item

print first_unique('aabccbdcbe')
#d            
print first_unique('abccbdcbe')            
#a

Counter uses its superclass dict to store the counts. Defining class OrderedCounter(Counter, OrderedDict) inserts OrderedDict between Counter and dict in method resolution order, adding the ability to remember insertion order.

(*) This is O(n) and efficient in that sense, but not the fastest solution, as benchmarks show.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the answer , can u tell me how it works pls ... I noticed that >>> OrderedDict(Counter('aabccbdcbe')) OrderedDict([('a', 2), ('c', 3), ('b', 3), ('e', 1), ('d', 1)]) and OrderedCounter('aabccbdcbe') OrderedCounter({'b': 3, 'c': 3, 'a': 2, 'd': 1, 'e': 1}) ...how are the two differing? –  Sandy Mar 19 '13 at 12:12
    
OrderedDict(Counter('aabccbdcbe')) constructs the ordered dict from results of the Counter that are in arbitrary order. –  Janne Karila Mar 19 '13 at 12:57
    
@Sandy Please, see my answer: it shows that Janne's solution is the slowest of the three ones I benchmarked –  eyquem Mar 19 '13 at 13:40
    
@eyquem thanks for the eye opening benchmark –  Sandy Mar 19 '13 at 14:25
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Here is an approach with good set of chars and bad set of chars (which appear more than one time):

import timeit
import collections
import operator
import random

s = [chr(i) for i in range(ord('a'), ord('z')) for j in range(100)] + ['z']

random.shuffle(s)
s = ''.join(s)

def good_bad_sets(s):
    setbad = set()
    setgood = set()
    for char in s:
        if(char not in setbad):
            if(char in setgood):
                setgood.remove(char)
                setbad.add(char)
            else:
                setgood.add(char)
    return s[min([s.index(char) for char in setgood])] if len(s) > 0 else None

def app_once(s):
    seen = set()
    only_appear_once = set()
    for i in s:
      if i in seen:
        only_appear_once.discard(i)
      else:
        seen.add(i)
        only_appear_once.add(i)
    return s[min([s.index(char) for char in only_appear_once])] if len(only_appear_once) > 0 else None

print('Good bad sets: %ss' % timeit.Timer(lambda : good_bad_sets(s)).timeit(100))
print('Oin\'s approach: %ss' % timeit.Timer(lambda : app_once(s)).timeit(100))
print('LC: %ss' % timeit.Timer(lambda : [a for a in s if s.count(a) == 1][0]).timeit(100))

I've compared it to the LC approach and somewhere around 50 chars the good and bad set approach becomes faster. Comparison of this approach vs. Oin's vs LC:

Good bad sets: 0.0419239997864s
Oin's approach: 0.0803039073944s
LC: 0.647999048233s
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So from the definition of the problem, it's clear that you need an O(n) solution, which means only going through the list once. All of the solutions which use a form of count are wrong, since they go through the list again in that operation. So you need to keep track of the counts yourself.

If you only had characters in that string, then you don't need to worry about storage and you could just use the character as a key in a dict. The values in that dict will be the index of the character in the string s. At the end we have to see which one was the first by calculating the minimum of the dictionary's values. This is an O(n) operation on a (possibly) shorter list than the first.

The total will still be O(c*n) therefore O(n).

from operator import itemgetter

seen = set()
only_appear_once = dict()

for i, x in enumerate(s):
  if x in seen and x in only_appear_once:
    only_appear_once.pop(x)
  else:
    seen.add(x)
    only_appear_once[x] = i

first_count_of_one = only_appear_once[min(only_appear_once.values(), key=itemgetter(1))]
share|improve this answer
    
What about the complexity then? –  petrichor Mar 19 '13 at 10:01
    
'in' and 'add' and 'remove' should be O(1), so the complexity is O(n) as you're only going through s once. –  Oin Mar 19 '13 at 10:02
    
removing an item that is not there causes your program to crash you should use discard. –  DJV Mar 19 '13 at 10:07
    
thanks, @DJV. Fixed the KeyError. –  Oin Mar 19 '13 at 10:08
    
also, you can't index a set, so basically you'll have to call index for every character in the only_appear_once set. –  DJV Mar 19 '13 at 10:09
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