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Here's my program:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

template <class T>
class Example
{
  private:
    T data;

  public:
    Example() { data = 0; }
    void setData(T elem) { data = elem; }

    template <class U>
    friend ostream& operator << (ostream &, const Example<U>&);

    friend ostream& operator << (ostream &, const Example<char>&);

    friend string operator + (const Example<char> &, const Example<char> &);

    template <class U>
    friend U operator + (const Example<U> &, const Example<U> &);
};

template <class U>
U operator + (const Example<U> &a, const Example<U> &b)
{
    U c;
    c = a+b;
    return(c);
}

string operator + (const Example<char> &a, const Example<char> &b)
{
       string a1("");
       a1+=a.data;
       a1+=b.data;
       return(a1);

}

template <class T>
ostream& operator << (ostream &o, const Example<T> &t)
    {
      o << t.data;
      return o;
    }


ostream& operator << (ostream &o, const Example<char> &t)
{
  o << "'" << t.data << "'";
  return o;
}



int main()
{
    Example<int> tInt1, tInt2;
    Example<char> tChar1, tChar2;

    tInt1.setData(15);
    tInt2.setData(30);

    tChar1.setData('A');
    tChar2.setData('B');

    cout << tInt1 << " + " << tInt2 << " = " << (tInt1 + tInt2) << endl;
    cout << tChar1 << " + " << tChar2 << " = " << (tChar1 + tChar2) << endl;
    return 0;
}

How do I go about making the two characters into a string that I can return? I've tried multiple ways and I can't seem to get any of them to work. I think it may have something to do with the characters being passed by reference.

EDIT: Ok so I got that specific function working with no problems. Now I got it compiled but before anything is displayed, there's a segmentation fault. Something is wrong with the addition for the the U data type. It'll add A and B and return AB, but it won't add 15 and 30. Also, I have to say thank you for all your help. I'm still new to programming and I really appreciate it.

share|improve this question
    
It depends on details of Example which you haven't shown. –  juanchopanza Mar 19 '13 at 9:51
    
u nead to show how single Example<char> to a character or string –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Mar 19 '13 at 9:56
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf Eye hope u uze bad spellin intenshionally? –  user529758 Mar 19 '13 at 9:59
    
I have updated my answer to the edits... –  sehe Mar 19 '13 at 10:15
    
Mmk all done and working. Thank you everyone for your help. I'll try to keep my future problems off of here as I like to figure them out myself. Especially when there as easy as this. But again, thank you. –  musicmanz93 Mar 19 '13 at 10:21
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4 Answers

#include <sstream>

string operator + (const Example<char> &a, const Example<char> &b) {
    std::ostringstream sstream;
    sstream << a << b;
    return sstream.str();
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 amazingly this work good with op's updated code (updated after this answer), and should work also for other template parameters –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Mar 19 '13 at 10:03
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Just use the built-in functionality of std::string, provided there's a member called data which holds the data of type <T>:

std::string operator+(const Example<char> &a, const Example<char> &b)
{
    std::string result("");
    result += a.data;
    result += b.data;
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
What's the reason for the downvote, seriously? –  user529758 Mar 19 '13 at 10:25
1  
I did not vote, but why would you expect anybody to explain their votes to you after you have attacked other people who did so? I have witnessed you make incorrect accusations against people, berate them, and so on. Your behavior encourages people to vote and not to explain. If you want explanations, you should change your behavior. –  Eric Postpischil Mar 19 '13 at 13:27
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You can do following:

string operator + (const Example<char> &a, const Example<char> &b)
{
    std::ostringstream ss;
    ss << a.data << b.data;

    return ss.str();
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for same as @2unco –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Mar 19 '13 at 10:04
    
Yeah, saw that after pressing enter :) @2unco as well as my code assumes that '<<' is defined for data type 'T'. –  layman Mar 19 '13 at 10:12
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The simplest thing that would work:

string operator + (const Example<char> &a, const Example<char> &b)
{
    return { a.data, b.data };
}

If you have an 'older' compiler:

string operator + (const Example<char> &a, const Example<char> &b)
{
    char both[] = {a.data, b.data};
    return string(both, both+2);
}

See it live: http://liveworkspace.org/code/2ORW8E$0

UPDATE To the edit question: There is also a big problem (infinite recursion) here:

template <class U>
U operator + (const Example<U> &a, const Example<U> &b)
{
    U c;
    c = a+b; // NEEDS TO BE a.data + b.data;
    return(c);
}

Here is a fixed version:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

template <class T>
class Example
{
private:
    T data;

public:
    Example() : data()
    {
    }
    void setData(T elem)
    {
        data = elem;
    }

    template <class U>
    friend ostream& operator << (ostream &, const Example<U>&);
    friend ostream& operator << (ostream &, const Example<char>&);
    friend string operator + (const Example<char> &, const Example<char> &);

    template <class U>
    friend U operator + (const Example<U> &, const Example<U> &);
};

template <class U>
U operator + (const Example<U> &a, const Example<U> &b)
{
    U c;
    c = a.data+b.data;
    return(c);
}

string operator + (const Example<char> &a, const Example<char> &b)
{
    char both[] = {a.data, b.data};
    return string(both, both+2);
}

template <class T>
ostream& operator << (ostream &o, const Example<T> &t)
{
    o << t.data;
    return o;
}


ostream& operator << (ostream &o, const Example<char> &t)
{
    o << "'" << t.data << "'";
    return o;
}

int main()
{
    Example<int> tInt1, tInt2;
    Example<char> tChar1, tChar2;
    tInt1.setData(15);
    tInt2.setData(30);
    tChar1.setData('A');
    tChar2.setData('B');
    cout << tInt1 << " + " << tInt2 << " = " << (tInt1 + tInt2) << endl;
    cout << tChar1 << " + " << tChar2 << " = " << (tChar1 + tChar2) << endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
the op's class doth not haz member data, and visual c++ doth not support braced initializer sintax, besides i'm not sure that it would realy denot an array in this case –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Mar 19 '13 at 9:57
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf thanks for pointing that out. Of course, everyone hath made assumptions - I posted mine so people can judge my assumptions for themselves :) –  sehe Mar 19 '13 at 9:59
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf ironically, the OP's class doth have data after all, and a few more issues which I touched upon in my updated answer :) –  sehe Mar 19 '13 at 10:14
    
You are awesome. Thank you for helping me out. –  musicmanz93 Mar 19 '13 at 10:16
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