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My Java app will be getting strings of the following form:

How now [[brown cow ]]. The arsonist [[ had oddly shaped ]] feet. The [[human torch was denied]] a bank loan.

And need a regex/method that would strip out every instance of [[ ]] (and all inclusive text), thus turning the above string into:

How now. The arsonist  feet. The  a bank loan.

Notice the preserved double-spaces (between arsonist and feet, and between The and a)? That's important too.

Not sure if a regex here is appropriate or if there is a more efficient way of culling out the unwanted [[ ]] instances.

share|improve this question
    
What have you tried so far? – Till Helge Mar 19 '13 at 10:06
    
@NilsH String.replace How ? – Abdullah Shaikh Mar 19 '13 at 10:08
    
@NilsH with String.replace it is hard to remove the part inside the brackets. Regex seems the way to go. – Vincent van der Weele Mar 19 '13 at 10:09
    
What is the expected behavior for [[ something [good] or may be [[ not so good]] – nhahtdh Mar 19 '13 at 10:12

This is in javascript.

var text = "How now [[brown cow ]]. The arsonist [[ had oddly shaped ]] feet. The [[human torch was denied]] a bank loan."
text.replace(/\[\[[^\]]+\]\]/g, "")

The regex to match the braces will be

/\[\[[^\]]+\]\]/g

So Java equivalent will be

text.replaceAll("\[\[[^\]]+\]\]", "");

and replace it with an empty string

regex which can remove both double and triple braces

text.replaceAll("\[?\[\[[^\]]+\]\]\]?", "")
share|improve this answer
    
What language is this? – default locale Mar 19 '13 at 10:10
3  
@defaultlocale seems like Javascript :p – HamZa Mar 19 '13 at 10:11
    
@Pankaj OP question was in java – Abdullah Shaikh Mar 19 '13 at 10:15
    
Thanks @Pankaj (+1) - please see my comment under MikeM's answer - I have the same question for you! – IAmYourFaja Mar 19 '13 at 10:16
1  
@DirtyMikeAndTheBoys edited the answer, here again, this is desired regex "\[?\[\[[^\]]+\]\]\]?" – Pankaj Phartiyal Mar 19 '13 at 10:19

Try using this code :

public class Test{
public static void main(String[] args) {
    String input = "How now [[brown cow ]]. The arsonist [[ had oddly shaped ]] feet. The [[human torch was denied]] a bank loan.";
    // Will replace all data within braces []
    String replaceAll = input.replaceAll("(\\[.+?\\])|(\\])", "");
    System.out.println(replaceAll);
}

}

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Ankur (+1) - please see my comment under MikeM's answer - I have the same question for you! – IAmYourFaja Mar 19 '13 at 10:17
    
Yes @DirtyMikeAndTheBoys - the code that I have give you will work fine. :-) Let me know, if you need anything else. – Ankur Shanbhag Mar 19 '13 at 10:22
    
@MikeM - It will work fine for all the combinations. I have tested it as well. Try it once. – Ankur Shanbhag Mar 19 '13 at 11:04
tring s = "How now [[brown cow ]]. The arsonist [[ had oddly shaped ]] feet. The [[human torch was denied]] a bank loan.";

s=s.replaceAll("\\[.*?\\]","").replace("]","");

Output:

How now . The arsonist  feet. The  a bank loan.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Achintya Jha (+1) - please see my comment under MikeM's answer - I have the same question for you! – IAmYourFaja Mar 19 '13 at 10:20
    
@DirtyMikeAndTheBoys It works for[[[ ]]] also. – Achintya Jha Mar 19 '13 at 10:22

This is simple with replaceAll

str = str.replaceAll( "\\[\\[[^\\]]*\\]\\]", "" );

Assumes no ] between the brackets.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @MikeM (+1) - and what if I have some instances of triple braces ([[[ ]]]) - does this same regex apply or do I have to change it? Thanks again! – IAmYourFaja Mar 19 '13 at 10:15

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