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I'm virtually a beginner at both Ruby and the Rails framework, which was why I've decided to ask for help before I do something that breaks the conventions of the framework.

I have a fairly solid OO programming background, and I'm pretty comfortable with beginner->intermediate level SQL queries. However, I've been having trouble wrapping my head around the ActiveRecord class that Rails supplies. My immediate instinct is to just scrap the ActiveRecord class entirely, and write out my own SQL queries by hand and wrap them up in models. However, I know ActiveRecords are a fairly integral part of the Rails framework, and avoiding them will just cause me pain in the future.

The following is my MySQL schema as it stands (I'll write a Rails Migration later on). I'll try to keep this question as concise as possible, but I may have to go into a little background to explain why I've modeled the schema as I have. I'm not overly attached to it, so if people have better ideas on the structure that'd be great.

-- Users table is a minimalized version of what it probably will be, but contains all pertinent information
CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS users (
    id          INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
    name        VARCHAR(20) UNIQUE NOT NULL
) Engine=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS hashtags (
    id          INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
    tag         VARCHAR(30) UNIQUE NOT NULL
) Engine=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS content_mentions (
    content_id  INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    user_id     INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL, 
    INDEX(content_id),
    FOREIGN KEY(user_id) REFERENCES users(id) ON DELETE CASCADE
) Engine=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS content_hashtags (
    content_id  INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    hashtag_id  INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    INDEX(content_id),
    FOREIGN KEY(hashtag_id) REFERENCES hashtags(id) ON DELETE CASCADE
) Engine=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS content_comments (
    id          INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
    user_id     INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    content_id  INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    text_body   VARCHAR(1000) NOT NULL,
    date_created TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
    FOREIGN KEY(user_id) REFERENCES users(id) ON DELETE CASCADE,
    INDEX(content_id)
) Engine=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS polls (
    id          INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
    user_id     INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    question    VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL,
    text_body   VARCHAR(1000) NOT NULL,
    date_created TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
    FOREIGN KEY(user_id) REFERENCES users(id) ON DELETE CASCADE
) Engine=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS poll_options (
    id          INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
    poll_id     INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    content     VARCHAR(150) NOT NULL,
    active      VARCHAR(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT 'Y',
    FOREIGN KEY(poll_id) REFERENCES polls(id) ON DELETE CASCADE
) Engine=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS poll_answers (
    poll_option_id  INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    user_id     INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    FOREIGN KEY(poll_option_id) REFERENCES poll_options(id) ON DELETE CASCADE,
    FOREIGN KEY(user_id) REFERENCES users(id) ON DELETE CASCADE,
    PRIMARY KEY(poll_option_id,user_id)
) Engine=InnoDB;

As the schema would indicate, this is a really basic web-poll application. Each poll has multiple options and each option can have multiple answers by different users. Now, the odd part perhaps looking at it is the content_* tables. The best way I can explain this is probably by describing it as an abstract table. I've never really done anything like that before, usually the relationships are between two or more explicit tables and I'll add the foreign keys as required. In this case, however, I may end up with multiple different types of content, all of which require hashtagging/mentioning/commenting. I don't know in advance what table the content_id refers to (the code will deal with the data it receives appropriately) so I've just indexed the column for now. I need to adjust the content_* tables to add a type column at some stage as once more than one content table is present, there may be duplicate content_id entries if both tables use an auto-incrementing primary key, I think that's a bit out of the scope of the question though.

On to the structuring of the ActiveRecord classes. The first part is handling the parsing of mentions/hashtags. I wrote an abstract Content class to handle the "abstract" side of the tables. It goes something like this (some of the parsing has been removed for brevity).

class Content < ActiveRecord::Base
    self.abstract_class = true;

    # relationships
    belongs_to :user

    has_many :content_mentions;
    has_many :content_hashtags;
    has_many :mentions, { :through => :content_mentions, :source => :user, :as => :content };
    has_many :hashtags, { :through => :content_hashtags, :as => :content };

    # available columns (in the abstract side of things)
    attr_accessible :text_body, :date_created;

    # database hooks
    around_save :around_save_hook

    # parsing
    ENTITY_PATTERN = /removed_for_brevity/iox;

    def render_html()
        # parsing of the text_body field for hashtags and mentions and replacing them with HTML
        # goes in here, but unrelated to the data so removed.
    end

protected

    # Is this the best way to do this?
    def around_save_hook()
        # save the main record first (so we have a content_id to pass to the join tables)
        yield

        # parse the content and build associations, raise a rollback if anything fails
        text_body.scan(ENTITY_PATTERN) do |boundary,token,value|
            m = $~;

            if m[:token] == '@'
                # mention
                unless mentions.where(:name => m[:value]).first
                    mention = User::where(:name => m[:value]).first;
                    next unless mention;

                    raise ActiveRecord::Rollback unless content_mentions.create({ :content_id => id, :user_id => mention.id });
                end
            else
                # hashtag
                unless hashtags.where(:tag => m[:value]).first
                    hashtag = Hashtag.where(:tag => m[:value]).first;

                    unless hashtag
                        hashtag = Hashtag.new({ :tag => m[:value] });
                        raise ActiveRecord::Rollback unless hashtag.save();
                    end

                    raise ActiveRecord::Rollback unless content_hashtags.create({ :content_id => id, :hashtag_id => hashtag.id });
                end
            end
        end
    end 
end

The main problem I have here is with the around_save_hook, is this the best place to parse and save the associations? How would I do it so that if the text_body was updated and some of the hashtags/mentions removed from the original, these changes would be reflected in the content_* associations, rather than just the new hashtags/mentions added without checking for removals?

The rest of the ActiveRecord classes are defined as follows:

class Poll < Content
    has_many :poll_options;
    has_many :poll_answers, { :through => :poll_options }

    attr_accessible :user_id, :question;
    validates :text_body, :presence => true, :length => { :maximum => 1000 };
end

class PollOption < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :poll;
    has_many :poll_answers;

    attr_accessible :content, :active, :poll_id;
end

class PollAnswer < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :poll_option;
    belongs_to :user;

    attr_accessible :user_id, :poll_option_id;
end

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
    attr_accessible :name;

    validates :name, :presence => true, :length => { :maximum => 20 };
end

class Hashtag < ActiveRecord::Base
    attr_accessible :tag;

        validates :tag, :presence => true, :length => { :maximum => 30 };
end

# Join table for content->users
class ContentMention < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :user;
    belongs_to :content, { :polymorphic => true };

    attr_accessible :content_id, :user_id;
end

# Join table for content->hashtags
class ContentHashtag < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :hashtag;
    belongs_to :content, { :polymorphic => true };

    attr_accessible :content_id, :hashtag_id;
end

So I guess my questions are as follows:

  1. Is the schema itself corrent (i.e is it grossly inefficient and poorly designed to use with rails? (if so, suggestions on how to correct it would be fantastic)
  2. Is Around Save the right place to parse and update the associations?
  3. Are my ActiveRecords set up correctly based on the current schema structure? (specifically I'm not sure if I'm using the polymorphic attribute correctly)
  4. How would I add options/answers to a Poll instance, without re-saving the entire content of the Poll (and thus triggering another redundant parsing of the content) while still retaining an OOP approach to this? (i.e options/answers are created through a public API from the Poll model)

It'd be really great if someone who's really comfortable with Rails, Ruby and ActiveRecord could run me up a quick copy of how they would implement the bare-bones of this. As I said I've never used the ActiveRecord class before so I'm not even sure how many raw SQL queries this simple code will be triggering on a single save() call already.

share|improve this question
1  
I think this question is a bit too big - it almost asking for consultancy on your app. I would say that if you're starting with Rails, just go ahead and try it, and as you make mistakes and learn then you can go back and improve incrementally. However, one tip is to use after_save instead of around_save and yield. –  joonty Mar 19 '13 at 10:58
    
I understand it's a fairly large question, but what I'm asking would only be a trivial amount of code, most of it is just some advice on correctly using ActiveRecords in nested join-tables, avoiding the need to redundantly update records. The hashtag/mention/comment side of the app is irrelevant to the question (other than a general question about structuring "abstract" tables), so essentially it's just asking how to implement a Poll using ActiveRecords, not really 'big'. As for the after_save method, I couldn't find a clear piece of documentation as to whether you can rollback inside it. –  Jason Larke Mar 19 '13 at 11:24
    
You're probably right that it's a trivial amount of code, but it's the understanding of the context that takes a huge amount of time investment for someone to be able to provide that trivial code. It would be better to break it down into smaller questions where possible. –  joonty Mar 19 '13 at 11:29
    
The understanding is fundamental to Rails, anyone that's comfortable with rails should already be familiar with the context and application of Active Records and as such this would be pretty straightforward to them. It's essentially just 3 tables... not a lot of work if you know what your doing. I could bang out the SQL in about 10-20 minutes manually, but I'd rather use ActiveRecords correctly. –  Jason Larke Mar 19 '13 at 12:04
    
Why are you using Rails anyway? –  fotanus Mar 27 '13 at 10:39
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+100

Here is a two part railscast covering aspects of implementing a poll/survey application. It covers most of your model related doubts.

http://railscasts.com/episodes/196-nested-model-form-part-1

http://railscasts.com/episodes/197-nested-model-form-part-2

I would create the dependent objects during assignment by over-riding the setter for text_body.

Eg:

def text_body=(val)
  write_attribute(:text_body, val).tap do |v|
    append_new_tags_and_mentions
  end
end

def append_new_tags_and_mentions
  tag_list, mention_list = extract_tags_and_mentions
  new_mentions = mention_list - mentions.where(name => mention_list).pluck(:name)    
  mentions.concat(*new_mentions) if new_mentions.present?   
  new_tags = tag_list - hashtags.where(tag => tag_list).pluck(:tag)
  hashtags.concat(*new_tags) if new_tags.present?
end

def extract_tags_and_mentions
  tag_list = []
  mention_list = []
  text_body.scan(ENTITY_PATTERN) do |boundary, token, value|
    if token == "@"
      mention_list << value
    else
      tag_list << value
    end
  end
  [tag_list, mention_list]
end

Add a validator to check the dependencies.

General guideline I wish I knew before I started programming in rails after working in Java/C++/SQL for a long time.

  • Do not hand code the table generation SQL

  • Use db:create rake tasks for creating tables

  • Rails does not support foregin keys. You can enforce it through validators.

  • Do not use semicolons to terminate the line. One of the joys of ruby is you don't have terminate lines.

  • Do not use explicit hashes for DSL API parameters.

    Use this idiom

    belongs_to :content, :polymorphic => true
    

    Instead of:

    belongs_to :content, { :polymorphic => true };
    
  • Use modules instead of inheritance for code re-usage.

  • Use each instead of for

  • Learn map, reduce (i.e. inject) functions on an array.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for the answer, I'll go watch the screen-casts when I get home. However I have a few issues with some of the later points you made. This may be due to my somewhat "stricter" background of languages though. Do not use explicit hashes for DSL API parameters. Why? One thing I've hated about ruby is that it doesn't enforce wrapping parenthesis around method arguments and it lets you lazily write hashes without the braces. For me, at least, writing arguments in that fashion makes it so much harder to decipher at a glance. Could be because I'm new to ruby, but I like the verbosity. –  Jason Larke Mar 22 '13 at 5:53
    
As for the explicit line terminators; I've spent so long writing them as a matter of course during C/C++,PHP,C#,Javascript...etc that it's so ingrained as to require a physical effort to remember to leave them out :) –  Jason Larke Mar 22 '13 at 5:54
1  
I empathize with the need to terminate the lines with semi-colons and explicitly surround the hashes with braces. In fact that is what I used when I started coding in Ruby. Convention is not to use them. I am quite sure year from now you will feel differently about this. There is a very good talk by Dave Thomas vimeo.com/61255738#t=2246. In one section he talks about the progression of code written by a non native Ruby developer. I found it apt. –  Harish Shetty Mar 22 '13 at 16:30
    
Thanks a lot for you answer, took a while for me to find the time to re-comment on it but the screencasts were pretty useful (despite skipping a lot of barebones info). Enjoy the bounty :). @Harish Shetty –  Jason Larke Mar 27 '13 at 14:29
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