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# Barn yard example: counting heads and legs

def solve(numLegs, numHeads):
    for numChicks in range(0, numHeads + 1):
    	numPigs = numHeads - numChicks
    	totLegs = 4*numPigs + 2*numChicks
    	if totLegs == numLegs:
    		return [numPigs, numChicks]
    	return [None, None]

def barnYard(heads, legs):
    pigs, chickens = solve(legs, heads)
    if pigs == None:
    	print "There is no solution."
    else:
    	print 'Number of pigs: ', pigs
    	print 'Number of Chickens: ', chickens

barnYard(20,56)

Expected result is 8 and 12 I think, but it returns 'There is no solution'. What am I doing wrong?

I'm just starting with programming, so please be nice ... :)

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It drives me slightly crazy that barnYard is (heads, legs) but solve is (legs, heads). It's a very small point, but I recommend keeping arguments in a consistent (and thus predictable) order. Other than that, nicely coded. –  steveha Oct 11 '09 at 5:22
1  
A Python debugger would have helped you solve this, but so would a simple print statement inside the loop. When you are trying to figure out the flow of control, it often helps to add verbose print statements that tell you what is going on. Something like "numChicks == 0, numPigs == 20, totLegs == 80" on the first loop, then "numChicks == 1, numPigs == 19, totLegs == 78" on the second loop, and so on. You would have noticed right away that it never got pass the first loop. –  steveha Oct 11 '09 at 5:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In solve(), your return statement is indented to be inside of the for loop. Back it out one level, and it should work just fine.

def solve(numLegs, numHeads):
    for numChicks in range(0, numHeads + 1):
        numPigs = numHeads - numChicks
        totLegs = 4*numPigs + 2*numChicks
        if totLegs == numLegs:
                return [numPigs, numChicks]
    return [None, None]
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Ah, I keep making this (indentation) mistake! I think I need to move from Textmate to some real IDE while I'm just a beginner. Thanks! –  3zzy Oct 11 '09 at 3:58
    
Nah, textmate should be fine; no ide would have helped you with that one. Maybe check out pdb though :). –  ABentSpoon Oct 11 '09 at 4:02

look at your indentation. return [None, None] is inside the loop. it returns [None, None] after the first iteration

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