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Here is example code with output:

set.seed(234)
a <- matrix(rnorm(100000), 10000,100)
dim(a)

fo1 <- function() apply(a, 1, sum)
fo2 <- function() a %*% rep(1, 100)
fo3 <- function() {
    n <- nrow(a)
    x <- numeric(n)
    for(i in seq_len(n))  x[i] <- sum(a[i, ])
    }
fo4 <- function() rowSums(a)

# install.packages("microbenchmark")
require(microbenchmark)

microbenchmark(fo1 , fo2, fo3, fo4 ,times = 100000)
# expr min lq median uq    max neval
#  fo1  81 90     91 96 188969 1e+05
#  fo2  75 87     90 94 241332 1e+05
#  fo3  75 84     87 91 271085 1e+05
#  fo4  72 88     91 97 39447 1e+05

I thought that apply and loops should be slower than the vectorized version, or the dedicated rowSums function - but they all seem to give very similar results (except for the max value).

Could any one suggest why this is the case?

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closed as too localized by flodel, Joshua Ulrich, Ari B. Friedman, Dirk Eddelbuettel, Josh O'Brien Mar 19 '13 at 15:22

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fwiw try .rowSums with manual nrow,ncol args –  mdsumner Mar 19 '13 at 11:29
7  
You're evaluating the time it takes to look up the function, not the actual function call. Try microbenchmark(fo1(), fo2()...). –  Martin Morgan Mar 19 '13 at 11:31
    
@MartinMorgan nice catch :D –  Hemmo Mar 19 '13 at 11:33
    
I am parallely embarrassed for my mistake - thanks for catching it Martin! –  Tal Galili Mar 19 '13 at 12:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Like @Martin noted, you are not calling the functions in microbenchmark. Also, the function fo3 doesn't return anything:

fo3 <- function() {
    n <- nrow(a)
    x <- numeric(n)
    for(i in seq_len(n))  x[i] <- sum(a[i, ])
    x #you missed this
}

And fo2 returns matrix whereas other functions return vector. So let's use

fo2 <- function() c(a %*% rep(1, 100))

Here are correct results:

microbenchmark(fo1() , fo2(), fo3(), fo4() ,times = 100)
Unit: milliseconds
  expr       min        lq    median        uq       max neval
 fo1() 33.437565 37.859724 39.961079 41.409828 85.950181   100
 fo2()  1.756187  1.820632  1.861232  1.899416  2.138938   100
 fo3() 35.356449 37.069169 37.713325 39.624361 51.001235   100
 fo4()  2.467656  2.529235  2.561986  2.616621  2.884215   100

You see that the matrix-vector multiplication is fastest, although the difference with rowSums is really small (calling the internal .rowSums instead doesn't affect the results). The differences between apply and for loop approach are also small, as apply is just a loop in disguise.

Note that

> identical(fo1(),fo2())
[1] FALSE
> identical(fo1(),fo3())
[1] TRUE
> identical(fo1(),fo4())
[1] TRUE
> all.equal(fo1(),fo2())
[1] TRUE

The matrix multiplication version gives slightly different results than others.

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2  
Might as well check that those functions are returning the same result; no sense comparing apples and oranges! –  Martin Morgan Mar 19 '13 at 11:41
    
@Matrin thanks, corrected. Didn't affect the results though. –  Hemmo Mar 19 '13 at 11:51
    
identical and all.equal only compare two arguments, so you need to compare results pair-wise. –  Martin Morgan Mar 19 '13 at 12:00
    
Oops, I did that first and then though to be clever and combine the results. Accidentally got the right logical values :) –  Hemmo Mar 19 '13 at 12:03
    
Nice answer, thanks Hemmo. –  Tal Galili Mar 19 '13 at 12:41

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