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Query 1:

select name,trans from sids s where apt='KAUS';

Query 2:

SELECT id,transition_id from std_sid_leg where data_supplier='E' and airport='KAUS';

Values of name is same that of id and trans with transition_id.Result set 1 is subset of result set 2.Both the tables have common columns as apt=airport If query alone couldnt work please provide any script. I need to compare the outputs of these 2 queries and print the data differences. Thank you.

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is it a homework? what have you come here for? –  raheel shan Mar 19 '13 at 11:39

1 Answer 1

You're looking for a combined left+right join.
This is called an full outer join (as opposed to a left/right outer join).
By selecting only the rows where join columns are null you'll get the mismatches; this is called an anti-join.

The full outer-anti-join looks like this:

select s.*, ssl.*
from sids s
outer join std_sid_leg ssl on (s.name = ssl.id and s.trans = ssl.transition_id)
where (s.name is null and s.trans is null) 
   or (ssl.id is null and ssl.transition_id is null) 
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hey Johan i couldnt get u what u had said..could u please explain in detail.Thank you –  user2037445 Mar 19 '13 at 12:14
    
What i actually asked for is..I have 2 queries that are performed on 2 different tables having different schema..The output of those queries need to be compared and the difference is to be displayed.It is somewhat similar to comparing of result sets but the problem is the queries were retrieved based on some condition and moreover the schema was different for the retrieved result sets.. –  user2037445 Mar 19 '13 at 12:17
    
Result 1: 'ACT' ,'ACT'; 'AUS3', 'ABI'; 'AUS3', 'AGJ'; 'AUS3', 'JCT'; Result 2: 'ACT', 'ACT'; 'AUS3', 'ABI'; 'AUS3', 'AGJ'; OUTPUT: 'AUS3', 'JCT'; –  user2037445 Mar 19 '13 at 12:20
    
Updated the answer –  Johan Mar 19 '13 at 16:03
    
Actually it's called a FULL outer join –  Strawberry Mar 19 '13 at 16:05

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