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I would like to draw a vertically aligned linked list, like the one from Wikimedia Commons:

Credit: wikimedia commons

My best shot so far is:

digraph foo {
        rankdir=LR;
        node [shape=record];
        a [label="{ <data> 12 | <ref> }"]
        b [label="{ <data> 99 | <ref> }"];
        c [label="{ <data> 37 | <ref> }"];
        d [shape=box];
        a:ref -> b:data [arrowhead=vee, arrowtail=dot, dir=both];
        b:ref -> c:data [arrowhead=vee, arrowtail=dot, dir=both];
        c:ref -> d      [arrowhead=vee, arrowtail=dot, dir=both];
}

Which gives:

enter image description here

How do I set arrowtail dot to originate from within the record, and set the d record to appear as an X node?

I've tried tailclip=false, with no luck.

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1  
For part of the answer, see: stackoverflow.com/questions/7020529/… –  minopret Mar 19 '13 at 12:04
    
Tried tailclip=false, no luck - updated my question. –  Adam Matan Mar 19 '13 at 12:10
    
Solution using TikZ rather than GraphViz (although personally I like GraphViz!): tex.stackexchange.com/questions/19286/… –  minopret Mar 19 '13 at 12:11
1  
It was the :c part I was missing, thanks. –  Adam Matan Mar 19 '13 at 12:16
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You'll need to set tailclip=false and indicate a compass point for the tail end of the edge:

digraph foo {
        rankdir=LR;
        node [shape=record];
        edge [tailclip=false];
        a [label="{ <data> 12 | <ref> }"]
        b [label="{ <data> 99 | <ref> }"];
        c [label="{ <data> 37 | <ref> }"];
        d [shape=box];
        a:ref:c -> b:data [arrowhead=vee, arrowtail=dot, dir=both];
        b:ref:c -> c:data [arrowhead=vee, arrowtail=dot, dir=both];
        c:ref:c -> d      [arrowhead=vee, arrowtail=dot, dir=both];
}

graphviz output

Unfortunately, the shape you need for the last node is not included in the default shapes available. You could add a custom shape using postscript or a bitmap image, or even SVG if using SVG output.

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I note that an X is not a standard arrow shape either. There goes that clever idea. Some authors just use the word "NULL" instead of a cross in the box for the empty node. If I had written PostScript code this decade, I would make you an EPS file that would suffice for the custom node shape. –  minopret Mar 19 '13 at 12:34
    
Depending on what output you need, you may be able to make something nice looking with SVG. Otherwise, just put a huge X in a box, change the font and its size for that node... a hack, I know :( –  marapet Mar 19 '13 at 12:40
    
Aha, I think it's easy and practical to create the EPS file needed for the custom node shape using a vector graphics editor such as Inkscape. –  minopret Mar 19 '13 at 12:41
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