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I'd like to control what is written to a stream, i.e. cout, for an object of a custom class. Is that possible in C++? In Java you could override the toString() method for similar purpose.

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4 Answers

up vote 52 down vote accepted

In C++ you can overload operator<< for ostream and your custom class:

class A {
public:
  int i;
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream &strm, const A &a) {
  return strm << "A(" << a.i << ")";
}

This way you can output instances of your class on streams:

A x = ...;
std::cout << x << std::endl;

In case your operator<< wants to print out internals of class A and really needs access to its private and protected members you could also declare it as a friend function:

class A {
private:
  friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, const A&);
  int j;
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream &strm, const A &a) {
  return strm << "A(" << a.j << ")";
}
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7  
It is better to declare the operator<< as friend function of the class as it might be required to access the private members of the class. –  Naveen Oct 11 '09 at 5:36
2  
Better yet declare it as friend, and also inside the body of the class - with that, you won't have to do using namespace for the namespace containing the operator (and the class), but ADL will find it so long as object of that class is one of operands. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 11 '09 at 5:45
    
... the above was meant to say "define it as friend inside the body of the class" - as in, an inline member definition. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 11 '09 at 5:48
2  
@fnieto: that dump public method is dirty and unnecessary. Using friend here is perfectly fine. Whether you prefer a redundant method or an intrusive friend is entirely a matter of taste, although friend has arguably been introduced for this exact purpose. –  Konrad Rudolph Oct 11 '09 at 13:32
    
@Pavel: Argument dependent lookup will find it anyway, as long as the operator is defined in the same namespace as the class. This has nothing to to with friends and doesn't need it to be declared/defined inside the class. Also, making operator<<() a member function won't work: you would have to make it a member function of std::ostream for it to accept a left hand operand of type std::ostream. –  sth Oct 11 '09 at 13:37
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You can also do it this way, allowing polymorphism:

class Base {
public:
   virtual std::ostream& dump(std::ostream& o) {
      return o << "Base: " << b << "; ";
   }
private:
  int b;
};

class Derived : public Base {
public:
   virtual std::ostream& dump(std::ostream& o) {
      return o << "Derived: " << d << "; ";
   }
private:
   int d;
}

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& o, const Base& b) { return b.dump(o); }
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+1 for virtual function, to copy Java's toString behaviour. –  Konrad Rudolph Oct 11 '09 at 13:33
    
Why dumb rather than directly specifying operator<< in the class? –  monksy Jul 19 '10 at 14:38
1  
beacause you don't want to have an infinite loop and a crash –  fnieto - Fernando Nieto Jul 29 '10 at 18:08
1  
Perhaps this technique is fast and easy for passing options on what to serialize. Otherwise it would be required to define another class friending operator<< that is initialized with the options and the data to serialize. –  Samuel Danielson Mar 20 '12 at 22:48
    
this should be the accepted answer –  prongs Jun 15 '13 at 8:29
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In C++11, to_string is finally added to the standard.

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/string/basic_string/to_string

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2  
This is a useful addition to this page, however the C++ implementation is significantly different to the one in Java/C#. In those languages, ToString() is a virtual function defined on the base class of all objects, and is therefore used as a standard way to express a string representation of any object. These functions on std::string only apply to built-in types. The idiomatic way in C++ is to override the << operator for custom types. –  Drew Noakes Mar 1 '13 at 20:26
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As an extension to what John said, if you want to extract the string representation and store it in a std::string do this:

// Suppose a class A
A a;
std::stringstream sstream;
sstream << a;
std::string s = sstream.str(); // or you could use sstream >> s but that would skip out whitespace

std::stringstream is located in the <sstream> header.

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The header is <sstream> –  Jonas Oct 11 '09 at 9:33
    
Oops... dang. Sorry about that. –  blwy10 Oct 11 '09 at 10:17
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