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Is there any predefined function in c++ to check whether the number is square of any number and same for the cube..

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, but it's easy to write one:

bool is_perfect_square(int n) {
    if (n < 0)
        return false;
    int root(round(sqrt(n)));
    return n == root * root;
}

bool is_perfect_cube(int n) {
    int root(round(cbrt(n)));
    return n == root * root * root;
}
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Where do you see a possible division by zero ? sqrt(0) and cbrt(0) are defined. –  Pierre Bourdon Oct 11 '09 at 5:48
    
The original answer I had in my mind used return n / root == root, but I ended up using a different approach. Thanks for pointing out! Will edit answer. –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 11 '09 at 5:52
3  
This won't always work, due to floating-point error: if sqrt() or cbrt() happens to return epsilon less than the actual root, the cast to an integer will truncate that, and the check will fail. To be completely bullet-proof against that, you also need to check if n == (root + 1) * (root + 1) for the square root case or if n == (root + 1) * (root + 1) * (root + 1) for the cube root case. –  Adam Rosenfield Oct 11 '09 at 17:52
16  
Oh god, it hurts my head. I kept looking for the "root" function until I realized you were just initializing an integer... I strongly dislike your coding style. –  Mark Oct 11 '09 at 17:53
4  
@Mark: You can dislike it all you want, but it's the "more-standard" initialisation style in C++; I think it's called "constructor syntax" or something like that. i.e., if you are constructing an object that, say, takes more than one constructor parameter, you'd have to use that syntax anyway. I don't like to make a special exception for numeric types, so I use constructor syntax for them too. –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 11 '09 at 18:57

sqrt(x), or in general, pow(x, 1./2) or pow(x, 1./3)

For example:

int n = 9;
int a = (int) sqrt((double) n);
if(a * a == n || (a+1) * (a+1) == n)  // in case of an off-by-one float error
    cout << "It's a square!\n";

Edit: or in general:

bool is_nth_power(int a, int n) {
  if(n <= 0)
    return false;
  if(a < 0 && n % 2 == 0)
    return false;
  a = abs(a);

  int b = pow(a, 1. / n);
  return pow((double) b, n) == a || pow((double) (b+1), n) == a;
}
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1  
The problem with using pow(x, 1./3) is that 1/3 does not have an exact representation in floating point, so you're not "really" getting the cube root. C99 onwards has cbrt, which should do a better job of getting the cube root. –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 11 '09 at 5:45
    
I suppose. But pow generalizes easier, and it's easy enough to correct for floating point errors. –  Jesse Beder Oct 11 '09 at 5:48

Try this:

#include<math.h>
int isperfect(long n)
{
    double xp=sqrt((double)n);
    if(n==(xp*xp))
        return 1;
    else
        return 0;
}
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No, there are no standard c or c++ functions to check whether an integer is a perfect square or a perfect cube.

If you want it to be fast and avoid using the float/double routines mentioned in most of the answers, then code a binary search using only integers. If you can find an n with n^2 < m < (n+1)^2, then m is not a perfect square. If m is a perfect square, then you'll find an n with n^2=m. The problem is discussed here: http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/41337/efficient-way-to-determine-if-a-number-is-perfect-square

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For identifying squares i tried this algorithm in java. With little syntax difference you can do it in c++ too. The logic is, the difference between every two consecutive perfect squares goes on increasing by 2. Diff(1,4)=3 , Diff(4,9)=5 , Diff(9,16)= 7 , Diff(16,25)= 9..... goes on. We can use this phenomenon to identify the perfect squares. Java code is,

    boolean isSquare(int num){
         int  initdiff = 3;
         int squarenum = 1;
         boolean flag = false;
         boolean square = false;
         while(flag != true){

                if(squarenum == num){

                    flag = true;
                    square = true;

                }else{

                    square = false;
                 }
                if(squarenum > num){

                    flag = true;
                }
            squarenum = squarenum + initdiff;
            initdiff = initdiff + 2;
   }
              return square;
 }  

To make the identification of squares faster we can use another phenomenon, the recursive sum of digits of perfect squares is always 1,4,7 or 9. So a much faster code can be...

  int recursiveSum(int num){
     int sum = 0;   
     while(num != 0){
     sum = sum + num%10;
     num = num/10;         
     }
     if(sum/10 != 0){         
        return recursiveSum(sum);     
     }
     else{
         return sum;
     }

 }
  boolean isSquare(int num){
         int  initdiff = 3;
         int squarenum = 1;
         boolean flag = false;
         boolean square = false;
         while(flag != true){

                if(squarenum == num){

                    flag = true;
                    square = true;

                }else{

                    square = false;
                 }
                if(squarenum > num){

                    flag = true;
                }
            squarenum = squarenum + initdiff;
            initdiff = initdiff + 2;
   }
              return square;
 }  

   boolean isCompleteSquare(int a){
    // System.out.println(recursiveSum(a));
     if(recursiveSum(a)==1 || recursiveSum(a)==4 || recursiveSum(a)==7 || recursiveSum(a)==9){

         if(isSquare(a)){

             return true;

         }else{
             return false;
         }


     }else{

         return false;


     }

  }
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