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I've been asked many times by my juniors about the areas in which C++ is widely used. I usually answer Operating Systems. Are there any other areas where its extensively used?

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closed as too broad by Bill the Lizard Nov 30 '13 at 13:10

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Meta logic: anywhere you need low level access and want high level convenience. – dmckee Oct 11 '09 at 23:04

15 Answers 15

up vote 13 down vote accepted

A quite large and probably quite definitive list of software written in C++ can be found at Bjarne Stroustrup's homepage.

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+1 good answer. – user181548 Oct 11 '09 at 6:41

Numerical computations: physics, graphical games, finance, statistics;

Bit fiddling: drivers, operating systems, networking, embedded devices;

Anywhere you need exact control of allocation of memory.

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Blatantly wrong. I remember some code where I was kind of wondering why one large positive integer * another large positive integer == a small negative integer. Go figure. Almost any numerical computation will require a dedicated library in C++. – aviraldg Oct 11 '09 at 6:22
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Good list. "embedded devices" should complete the list (even though many such apps now use java where possible, indeed java was invented for that the purpose of making such embedded applications more reliable, as these are often not easily updated) – mjv Oct 11 '09 at 6:24
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@Aviraldg the fact that numerical computation libraries are in C seems to strengthen the validity of Kinopiko's list not making it so "wrong"... ? – mjv Oct 11 '09 at 6:27
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@Aviraldg: You seem to be grinding the C axe a little. – user181548 Oct 11 '09 at 6:39
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@Aviraldg - The GNU MP BigNum has an allegedly quite pleasant to use wrapper for C++. C++ allows you to get the power of C combined with a few niceties, like operator overloading, that would make code using the GMP much easier to use and understand than having to look up all the mpz_do_crazy_stuff() functions. – Chris Lutz Oct 11 '09 at 6:45

C++ is also used heavily in real-time financial market data software. Latency here is very important. C++ is great choice since it's almost the closest to metal.

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I wouldn't say Operating Systems actually. The Linux & Windows kernels are mostly C, with only userland stuff being C++ (granted, drivers could be written in anything). I'm not sure about Mach (OS X), but I wouldn't be surprised if it were mostly C as well.

C++ filled this wonderful nitch of "Object Oriented, but fast enough for dinky computers in the late-80s & early-90s". Accordingly, anything written in the 90s had a good chance of being written in C++; applications, drivers, games, whatever.

Today, new development seems to be done mostly in managed (JVM/.NET) languages. Not that there isn't any new C++ development; games, in particular, are still performance limited enough to use C++ in many cases.

In short:

  1. Drivers
  2. Games
  3. LEGACY CODE
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While I'm not sure about C++, but C is extinsively used in the OSS world and the GNU/FSF world. Even today. So calling C or C++ legacy code isn't quite right. – aviraldg Oct 11 '09 at 6:26
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Mac OS X is based on FreeBSD, which is written in C. If anything, the OS X guys wrote the object-oriented stuff they needed in Objective-C. – Chris Lutz Oct 11 '09 at 6:27
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C isn't legacy by any means. Also, by legacy code I mean anything already written. It doesn't need to be ancient, just extant. Naturally, additions to existing code will tend to be in the same language; likewise, I categorize such development as being on legacy systems. – Kevin Montrose Oct 11 '09 at 6:30
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@Kevin: And what does this show except a bias of the GNU people for C? And why don't I wonder, given some of the (embarrassingly wrong) criticism from Linus Torwalds towards C++? And yet, one of the best C++ compilers (and probably even the most wide-spread one) comes from the GNU people. – sbi Oct 11 '09 at 6:50
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@sbi: I'm not sure where you're coming from. C is the language for development in all modern Operating Systems, that alone defines it as modern. It also remains one of the "lingua francas" of computer science. C++ was a good tool 20 years ago, and remains in use on projects dating from that time. I posit that better tools have since become available, displacing C++. How does that relate to Linus or gcc? – Kevin Montrose Oct 11 '09 at 6:56

C++ and C are used heavily in embedded systems since one can have deterministic control of memory and other scarce resources. I think most games (well at least the games I play) are still written in C++, probably because there exists large frameworks written in C++ which have been fully tested and are very capable.

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And because games also need deterministic control over memory and system resources. They are also performance-critical, so even a language that is "only 10% slower" than C++ is unacceptable (unless you'd be happy with a game that had 10% less stuff on screen). – Crashworks Oct 11 '09 at 9:35
    
10% less stuff on the screen when playing Freecell WOULD suck - I'd be missing 5.2 cards! – warren Oct 23 '09 at 7:36

Around Basingstoke apparently.

(unemployed C++ guy in Glasgow)

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Sorry for you, but at least you've kept your sense of humour. – Clifford Oct 11 '09 at 20:18

it's used where you find it solve your problems efficiency. Compilers, writing Drivers ...

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If you really want efficiency, then you'll want to use C. With ASM. – aviraldg Oct 11 '09 at 6:23
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@Aviraldg - I'm not even a C++ user, and you're wrong. There are some things that are actually more efficient in C++, and as compilers get better and better, the differences between C and C++ will shrink. Games (an area that needs high efficiency) have long been written in C++. You can (only) get efficiency in any language if you know what you're doing. – Chris Lutz Oct 11 '09 at 6:30
    
You wouldn't choose C++ for maximum efficiency. Perhaps maximum efficiency with some minimum level of maintainability. – Kevin Montrose Oct 11 '09 at 6:32
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@Aviraldg: There's nothing in C++ that makes it inherently less efficient than C, except that many programmers understand too little of the language to know what individual features cost and when and how to apply them to certain problems. If you need polymorphism, a switch over a type enum as often done in in C is often less effective than C++' virtual functions (and using function pointers is virtual functions - just without compiler support). When you want to do numerical applications, C++ can be as efficient as FORTRAN - only the code is more readable. See the >10 years old blitz++. – sbi Oct 11 '09 at 6:38
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@Aviraldg Games use C++ because it's fast, not just thanks to OOP but it definitely plays a part. – Jonas Oct 11 '09 at 9:47

Currently it is in game development and performance critical applications. However, there is lots of older stuff written in C++ which was mostly written before Java and .NET were introduced, and this code still needs to be maintained.

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Not necessarily before Java/.NET were introduced, so much as before Java/.NET had developed to a usable rate of efficiency. – Chris Lutz Oct 11 '09 at 6:32

I have seen C++ used quite heavily in GUIs, due to the object orientated nature being sort of natural for "widgets".

I once saw it used in safety-critical code for an aircraft. This still gives me nightmares.

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I've seen C++ code in places that would give most people nightmares too :-) – Danny Varod Oct 11 '09 at 17:53

Any application based on Qt will use it as Qt is written in C++.

Also, since KDE is based on Qt pretty much the whole desktop environment including the applications designed to work within it are therefore written in C++.

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There's PyQt, which brings Qt for python. (There's also another totally open-source bridge for Python<->Qt in the works, but I've forgotten it's name) – Macke Oct 13 '09 at 18:02

C++ in Operating Systems: No kernels (the core bit that really does all the nasty work like memory management and drivers ) that I know of are written in C++, just C. Linux is written in C and so is Windows.

See here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/580292/what-languages-are-windows-mac-os-x-and-linux-written-in

Applications ( non-kernel bits that make up an OS ) these days are written in whatever language seems best for the job.

You would choose C++ if the following were important to you:

  • You want to make heavy use of classes and inheritence
  • You only plan on working on one OS
  • You want reasonable performance
  • Your developers already know C++
  • You want to divide work on similar components to different people or teams ( you can give each time a class or interface to implement )

You can do all of the above with C, portability between platforms is still an issue ( C++ is equally platform specific as most C ) In C you have to be more strict make good use of static and dynamic analysis tools. It's easier to leak memory in C than in C++ too.

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Consider this: From the introduction of MFC until the introduction of the .NET framework, C++ was the preferred language for Windows development. So that should tell you something. Preferred by Microsoft that is, many developers still prefer it to .Net languages.

C++ is a language capable of systems level programming, but also due to the provision of extensive libraries it is used for applications programming also. I would guess that almost every application running on your Desktop PC was written in C++.

If you can get a library for anything, you can almost certainly get it for C++.

It is widely used in the games industry, and to some extent in the embedded systems domain.

So I would say - 'everywhere'. It is after all a 'general purpose' programming language.

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Most antivirus software are written in C++

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  • Several major operating systems have been written in c++
  • Uncompromising low-level efficiency essential for C++. This allows us to use C++ to write device drivers
  • Much numerical, scientific, and engineering computation is done in C++.
  • Graphics and user interfaces are areas in which C++ is heavily used.
  • C++ is widely used for teaching and research
  • Games
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The only operating system written in C++ was BeOS. The rest may use C++ in a few places, but predominantly use pure C. – Chris Lutz Oct 11 '09 at 7:15

In legacy code...

Even Stroustrup admits C++ has many mistakes, most inherited from C. That is why C++0x is being developed.

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While I'm not sure about C++, but C is extinsively used in the OSS world and the GNU/FSF world. Even today. So calling C or C++ legacy code isn't quite right. – aviraldg Oct 11 '09 at 6:26
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There are plenty of new C++ projects started all of the time. I work in motion control and we use C++ more than any other language. -1 – Ed S. Oct 11 '09 at 6:43
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I like legacy code, it has that inimitable patina of antiquity. – user181548 Oct 11 '09 at 7:00
    
through the answers above its proved u r wrong. – vaibhav Oct 11 '09 at 19:55
    
I write in C++ myself, doesn't mean its main use isn't legacy code, it just means there is too much legacy code :-) – Danny Varod Oct 11 '09 at 21:17

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