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I am new to python, so here is my problem. I get the error "IndentationError: expected an indented block" on y_list in line 31 -> after the first if. The file I load includes alot of numbers, and the idea is to skip the negative ones in the socalled y_list.

filename = "data_5.dat" # this file can also be found in the sandbox folder 
x_list = []
y_list = []

fp = open(filename)
for line in fp:
    var1, var2  = line.split(",")    # here we wish to split the line using the ',' character

    # since we want them in numeric format we need to convert
    a = float(var1)
    b = float(var2)

    # put them into two lists
    x_list.append(a)
    y_list.append(b)

fp.close()    # close the file


x = x_list
y = y_list

I = 0.0
L = 0.0

for k in range(1, len(x)):
if y_list>0:
        y_list.append(y)
        I += y[k-1] * (x[k] - x[k-1])

for k in range(1, len(x)):
if y_list>0:
        y_list.append(y)
        L += y[k] * (x[k] - x[k-1])

print I
print L
print (I+L)/2
share|improve this question
1  
The both if y_list>0: lines should be indented by four spaces. –  eumiro Mar 19 '13 at 13:05
    
@eumiro, That may be an artifact of the Markup system. In plaintext, those lines are indented, but with tabs instead of spaces. –  Kevin Mar 19 '13 at 13:06
    
@Kevin: That is a big hint as to what is wrong here.. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 19 '13 at 13:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
for k in range(1, len(x)):
if y_list>0:
        y_list.append(y)
        I += y[k-1] * (x[k] - x[k-1])

These if blocks are part of a for block, so they need to be indented one from them:

for k in range(1, len(x)):
    if y_list>0:
        y_list.append(y)
        I += y[k-1] * (x[k] - x[k-1])

The standard is to use four spaces, but it's common to run into problems like this if you're mixing tabs and spaces, even if it's technically valid Python.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry about that. Wrote wrong here, but I got it your way in python –  user2186583 Mar 19 '13 at 13:12

Go to the line number 31 (then line 36 as well) and indent it. Hit the tab key at the beginning of the line so it'll stand out to the right a bit.

share|improve this answer
    
Not eight! Rather 3 spaces. ;) –  ulidtko Mar 19 '13 at 13:07
1  
Not 3! Rather, 4 spaces. So sayeth the PEP8. –  Kevin Mar 19 '13 at 13:08
    
Not PEP8! Rather, I have my own unique sense of code beauty. :) –  ulidtko Mar 19 '13 at 13:10
    
I used spaces in this coding so it would look better, bust using tab in python itself. If i tab it one more time it skips out of the "if" and, dont it just be like if there was nothing inside the "if" at all? –  user2186583 Mar 19 '13 at 13:10
    
@user2186583 I don't insist on inserting the ASCII 9 symbol a.k.a. a tab. You could as well use the PEP8-recommended 4 spaces. Most editors will allow you to configure the tab key accordingly. –  ulidtko Mar 19 '13 at 13:12

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