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Sometimes it is useful to "clone" a row or column vector to a matrix. By cloning I mean converting a row vector such as

[1,2,3]

Into a matrix

[[1,2,3]
 [1,2,3]
 [1,2,3]
]

or a column vector such as

[1
 2
 3
]

into

[[1,1,1]
 [2,2,2]
 [3,3,3]
]

In matlab or octave this is done pretty easily:

 x = [1,2,3]
 a = ones(3,1) * x
 a =

    1   2   3
    1   2   3
    1   2   3

 b = (x') * ones(1,3)
 b =

    1   1   1
    2   2   2
    3   3   3

I want to repeat this in numpy, but unsuccessfully

In [14]: x = array([1,2,3])
In [14]: ones((3,1)) * x
Out[14]:
array([[ 1.,  2.,  3.],
       [ 1.,  2.,  3.],
       [ 1.,  2.,  3.]])
# so far so good
In [16]: x.transpose() * ones((1,3))
Out[16]: array([[ 1.,  2.,  3.]])
# DAMN
# I end up with 
In [17]: (ones((3,1)) * x).transpose()
Out[17]:
array([[ 1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 2.,  2.,  2.],
       [ 3.,  3.,  3.]])

Why wasn't the first method (In[16]) working? Is there a way to achieve this task in python in a more elegant way?

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1  
In Matlab, note that it is much faster to use repmat: repmat([1 2 3],3,1) or repmat([1 2 3].',1,3) –  Luis Mendo Oct 8 '13 at 14:07
    
Octave also has repmat. –  MattDiPasquale Mar 31 at 2:29
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4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Here's an elegant, Pythonic way to do it:

>>> array([[1,2,3],]*3)
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [1, 2, 3],
       [1, 2, 3]])

>>> array([[1,2,3],]*3).transpose()
array([[1, 1, 1],
       [2, 2, 2],
       [3, 3, 3]])

the problem with [16] seems to be that the transpose has no effect for an array. you're probably wanting a matrix instead:

>>> x = array([1,2,3])
>>> x
array([1, 2, 3])
>>> x.transpose()
array([1, 2, 3])
>>> matrix([1,2,3])
matrix([[1, 2, 3]])
>>> matrix([1,2,3]).transpose()
matrix([[1],
        [2],
        [3]])
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(transpose works for 2D arrays, e.g. for the square one in the example, or when turning into a (N,1)-shape array using .reshape(-1, 1)) –  Mark Mar 21 at 13:28
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Use numpy.tile:

>>> tile(array([1,2,3]), (3, 1))
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [1, 2, 3],
       [1, 2, 3]])

or for repeating columns:

>>> tile(array([[1,2,3]]).transpose(), (1, 3))
array([[1, 1, 1],
       [2, 2, 2],
       [3, 3, 3]])
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2  
Upvote! On my system, for a vector with 10000 elements repeated 1000 times, the tile method is 19.5 times faster than the method in the currently accepted answer (using the multiplication-operator-method). –  Jan-Philip Gehrcke Jun 27 '12 at 14:26
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First note that with numpy's broadcasting operations it's usually not necessary to duplicate rows and columns. See this and this for descriptions.

But to do this, repeat and newaxis are probably the best way

In [12]: x = array([1,2,3])

In [13]: repeat(x[:,newaxis], 3, 1)
Out[13]: 
array([[1, 1, 1],
       [2, 2, 2],
       [3, 3, 3]])

In [14]: repeat(x[newaxis,:], 3, 0)
Out[14]: 
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [1, 2, 3],
       [1, 2, 3]])

This example is for a row vector, but applying this to a column vector is hopefully obvious. repeat seems to spell this well, but you can also do it via multiplication as in your example

In [15]: x = array([[1, 2, 3]])  # note the double brackets

In [16]: (ones((3,1))*x).transpose()
Out[16]: 
array([[ 1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 2.,  2.,  2.],
       [ 3.,  3.,  3.]])
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3  
newaxis has the additional benefit that it doesn't actually copy the data until it needs to. So if you are doing this to multiply or add to another 3x3 array, the repeat is unnecessary. Read up on numpy broadcasting to get the idea. –  AFoglia Oct 12 '09 at 15:20
    
@AFoglia - Good point. I updated my answer to point this out. –  tom10 Oct 12 '09 at 16:22
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I think using the broadcast in numpy is the best, and faster

I did a compare as following

import numpy as np
b = np.random.randn(1000)
In [105]: %timeit c = np.tile(b[:, newaxis], (1,100))
1000 loops, best of 3: 354 µs per loop

In [106]: %timeit c = np.repeat(b[:, newaxis], 100, axis=1)
1000 loops, best of 3: 347 µs per loop

In [107]: %timeit c = np.array([b,]*100).transpose()
100 loops, best of 3: 5.56 ms per loop

about 15 times faster using broadcast

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