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I have sets S1 = {s11,s12,s13), S2 = {s21,s22,s23) and so on till SN.I need to generate all the permutations consisting elements of S1,S2..SN.. such that there is only 1 element from each of the sets.

For eg:

S1 = {a,b,c}
S2 = {d,e,f}
S3 = {g,h,i}

My permuations would be:

{a,d,g}, {a,d,h}, {a,d,i}, {a,e,g}, {a,e,h}....

How would I go about doing it? (I could randomly go about picking up 1 from each and merging them, but that is even in my knowledge a bad idea).

For the sake of generality assume that there are 'n' elements in each set. I am looking at implementing it in C. Please note that 'N' and 'n' is not fixed.

share|improve this question
    
Like the Cartesian Product? – GManNickG Oct 11 '09 at 8:04
    
Yes. Its basically a Cartesian product of the sets. – Amit Oct 11 '09 at 8:07
    
How are you storing them? – GManNickG Oct 11 '09 at 8:09
    
I can have a 2-D matrix representation. But, again, there can be any data structure, as long as it is not a overkill and code-able in C. – Amit Oct 11 '09 at 8:10
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's just a matter of recursion. Let's assume these definitions.

const int MAXE = 1000, MAXN = 1000;
int N;                // number of sets.
int num[MAXN];        // number of elements of each set.
int set[MAXN][MAXE];  // elements of each set. i-th set has elements from
                      // set[i][0] until set[i][num[i]-1].
int result[MAXN];     // temporary array to hold each permutation.

The function is

void permute(int i)
{
    if (i == N)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < N; j++)
            printf("%d%c", result[j], j==N-1 ? '\n' : ' ');
    }
    else
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < num[i]; j++)
        {
            result[i] = set[i][j];
            permute(i+1);
        }
    }
}

To generate the permutations, simply call permute(0);

share|improve this answer

Generic solution:

typedef struct sett
{
  int* nums;
  int size;
} t_set;


inline void swap(t_set *set, int a, int b)
{
  int tmp = set->nums[a];
  set->nums[a] = set->nums[b];
  set->nums[b] = tmp;
}

void permute_set(t_set *set, int from, void func(t_set *))
{
  int i;
  if (from == set->size - 1) {
    func(set);
    return;
  }
  for (i = from; i < set->size; i++) {
    swap(set, from, i);
    permute_set(set, from + 1, func);
    swap(set, i, from);
  }
}


t_set* create_set(int size)
{
  t_set *set = (t_set*) calloc(1, sizeof(t_set));
  int i;
  set->size = size;
  set->nums = (int*) calloc(set->size, sizeof(int));
  for(i = 0; i < set->size; i++)
    set->nums[i] = i + 1;
  return set;
}

void print_set(t_set *set) {
  int i;
  if (set) {
    for (i = 0; i < set->size; i++)
      printf("%d  ", set->nums[i]);
    printf("\n");
  }
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  t_set *set = create_set(4);
  permute_set(set, 0, print_set);

}
share|improve this answer
    
Got it. Looking. thanks! – Amit Oct 11 '09 at 8:23
    
It's a pointer to a function that takes a pointer to a t_set and returns nothing. A callback function. – GManNickG Oct 11 '09 at 8:23
    
Thanks a lot. It's just what I needed to. You already had this coded up? :) – Amit Oct 11 '09 at 8:25
    
Woah! Where's the error checking in create_set() ? How are you going to explain the segfault to your angry client when his OS runs out of memory? – Chris Lutz Oct 11 '09 at 8:27
    
Also, don't use int for sizes. At a bare minimum use some unsigned type, and preferably use size_t since it's the type designed for storing sizes (any other type may not be big enough or be too big, which can cause problems). – Chris Lutz Oct 11 '09 at 8:28

You may think about the elements of a set as values of a cycle counter. 3 sets means 3 for cycles (as in GMan answare), N sets means N (emulated) cycles:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h> 

int set[3][2] = { {1,2}, {3,4}, {5,6} };

void print_set( int *ndx, int num_rows ){
  for( int i=0; i<num_rows; i++ ) printf("%i ", set[i][ndx[i]] );
  puts("");
}

int main(){
  int num_cols = sizeof(set[0])/sizeof(set[0][0]);
  int num_rows = sizeof(set)/sizeof(set[0]);
  int *ndx = malloc( num_rows * sizeof(*ndx) );

  int i=0; ndx[i] = -1;
  do{
    ndx[i]++; while( ++i<num_rows ) ndx[i]=0;
    print_set( ndx, num_rows );
    while( --i>=0 && ndx[i]>=num_cols-1 );
  }while( i>=0 );
}
share|improve this answer

If you know exactly how many sets there are and it's a small number one might normally do this with nested loops. If the number of sets is greater than 2 or 3, or it is variable, then a recursive algorithm starts to make sense.

And if this is homework, it's likely that implementing a recursive algorithm is the object of the entire assignment. Think about it, for each set, you can call the enumeration function recursively and have it start enumerating the next set...

share|improve this answer
    
Its not a homework. I have also been thinking about the soln. as a recursion based procedure. Let me see if I can think this up. – Amit Oct 11 '09 at 8:16

If they are in a container, just iterate through each:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int set1[] = {1, 2, 3};
    int set2[] = {4, 5, 6};
    int set3[] = {7, 8, 9};

    for (unsigned i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
    {
        for (unsigned j = 0; j < 3; ++j)
        {
            for (unsigned k = 0; k < 3; ++k)
            {
                printf("(%d, %d, %d)", set1[i], set2[j], set3[k]);
            }
        }
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That was easy :) The number of Sets in not fixed. – Amit Oct 11 '09 at 8:15
    
Basically then you'll want some dynamic container. I'll work on an example, but my disclaimer is I'm a C++ programmer, not a C programmer. – GManNickG Oct 11 '09 at 8:20
    
On second thought, giorgian basically read my mind. I'll leave this here as a simple solution for passer-by's. – GManNickG Oct 11 '09 at 8:21
    
No problems. 'giorgian' has answered me. Thanks a ton. – Amit Oct 11 '09 at 8:25

This is a fairly simple iterative implementation which you should be able to adapt as necessary:

#define SETSIZE 3
#define NSETS 4

void permute(void)
{
    char setofsets[NSETS][SETSIZE] = {
        { 'a', 'b', 'c'},
        { 'd', 'e', 'f'},
        { 'g', 'h', 'i'},
        { 'j', 'k', 'l'}};
    char result[NSETS + 1];
    int i[NSETS]; /* loop indexes, one for each set */
    int j;

    /* intialise loop indexes */
    for (j = 0; j < NSETS; j++)
        i[j] = 0;

    do {
        /* Construct permutation as string */
        for (j = 0; j < NSETS; j++)
            result[j] = setofsets[j][i[j]];
        result[NSETS] = '\0';

        printf("%s\n", result);

        /* Increment indexes, starting from last set */
        j = NSETS;
        do {
            j--;
            i[j] = (i[j] + 1) % SETSIZE;

        } while (i[j] == 0 && j > 0);
    } while (j > 0 || i[j] != 0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Caf: Before I asked the question here, and not able to afford to take more time to think, I was stuck at the part where I had to increment the indexes. You got it right, with the mod operator. – Amit Oct 11 '09 at 14:39

The most efficient method I could come up with (in C#):

string[] sets = new string[] { "abc", "def", "gh" };
int count = 1;
foreach (string set in sets)
{
    count *= set.Length;
}

for (int i = 0; i < count; ++i)
{
    var prev = count;
    foreach (string set in sets)
    {
        prev = prev / set.Length;
        Console.Write(set[(i / prev) % set.Length]);
        Console.Write(" ");
    }

    Console.WriteLine();
}
share|improve this answer

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