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i have an interface that also has a normal method, how do i call that then?

class Animal{
   virtual void virtualFunction()=0;
}

class Cow : Animal{
   virtual void virtualFunction(){}
   void nonVirtualFunction(){}
}

class main{
   Animal *a = new Cow();
   a->virtualFunction();
}

^: THIS works, but when i do...

a->nonVirtualFunction();

it says that the class Animal doesn't have this method, i know that ofcourse, but what way is best to call that method?

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you're going to call a function that is a member of Cow, don't store it in a polymorphic Animal pointer in the first place:

Cow* c = new Cow();
c->nonVirtualFunction();

It doesn't make sense to store a Cow in an Animal* if you're going to use it in a Cow-specific way.

You can use dynamic_cast to check the dynamic type of an object at run time:

Animal* a = new Cow();
if (Cow* c = dynamic_cast<Cow*>(a)) {
  c->nonVirtualFunction();
}

However, this is usually a sign of bad design.

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Thanks indeed, didn't know that, i will use the Cow* c = new Cow(); indeed! –  Sebastiaan van Dorst Mar 19 '13 at 15:08
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You need to use a Cow pointer to call nonVirtualFunction. The Animal pointer is a pointer to the SUBSET of the Cow that has the interface of an Animal.

The ONLY way to call nonVirtualFunction is to get a Cow pointer.

Cow *c = dynamic_cast<Cow*>(a); 

will give you such a pointer, assuming that a really does point to a Cow.

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I will go for Cow* c = new Cow(); indeed! thanks for the hlp –  Sebastiaan van Dorst Mar 19 '13 at 15:09
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I will use real names for the methods instead of placeholders in order to explain myself better:

class Animal{
   virtual void move()=0;
}

class Cow : Animal{
   virtual void move(){}
   void moo(){}
}

int main () {
   Animal *a = new Cow();
   a->move();
   a->moo(); // ERROR
}

Well, of course that's an error: why on earth would you want to make a generic Animal moo? So the problem is not how to call moo on any Animal; it just happens that this call is meaningless and the compiler helps us noticing.

Now, an Animal may have a non-virtual method that can be called on any animal with no need to rewrite it on subclasses, for instance:

class Animal{
   // Everything else, plus:
   std::string Name() {return name;}

private:
   std::string name;
}

int main () {
   Animal *a = new Cow();
   a->move();
   std::string animalName = a->Name(); // OK
}

As you can see, if you have a good design the problem disappears.

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1  
Hmm indeed, your way with real names instead of placeholders is indeed clearer! will do that :) But thanks, have the answer now indeed, should just make a cow *c = new cow! –  Sebastiaan van Dorst Mar 19 '13 at 15:07
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