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I've been playing around with the assembly output switch for GCC:

gcc -S -c helloworld.c

helloworld.c:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void){
    printf("Hello World!\n");
    return 0;
}

helloworld.s:

    .file   "helloworld.c"
    .section    .rodata
.LC0:
    .string "Hello World!"
    .text
    .globl  main
    .type   main, @function
main:
.LFB0:
    .cfi_startproc
    pushq   %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    .cfi_offset 6, -16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 6
    movl    $.LC0, %edi
    call    puts
    movl    $0, %eax
    popq    %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa 7, 8
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE0:
    .size   main, .-main
    .ident  "GCC: (Debian 4.7.2-5) 4.7.2"
    .section    .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

In the output helloworld.s file, I notice that the assembly command to output the "Hello World!" text is simply:

call puts

However, the helloworld.s1 file doesn't have the puts procedure assembly code within it. Where would I be able to view this assembly code?

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3  
This is because your C program is expecting to be linked with the standard C runtime library, which has puts() in it. You can of course dig up the library file on your system as disassemble it, if you feel like it. –  unwind Mar 19 '13 at 14:41
    
Would this be the libc.so file? –  Vilhelm Gray Mar 19 '13 at 14:43
2  
Yes, it is the libc.so; and I suggest to compile with gcc -O -S -fverbose-asm –  Basile Starynkevitch Mar 19 '13 at 14:54
    
I couldn't get objdump to disassemble libc.so, but I did find the code in libc.a under the <puts> section: objdump -d /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.a –  Vilhelm Gray Mar 19 '13 at 15:00
1  
Debian uses eglibc which is open-source, so you can see actual C source code of it. –  Victor Sorokin Mar 19 '13 at 15:07

3 Answers 3

EDIT: this is not actually an answer to the original question, but since it's getting upvoted the info seems to be useful, so...


It's an optimization by GCC. Since your string does not contain any formatting characters and ends with a newline, GCC replaces the call with puts which produces the same output but is much faster (since it doesn't need to scan the string for formatting specifiers). Try something like:

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
    printf("Hello World!\nargc=%d", argc);
    return 0;
}

And you will see your printf in the assembly.

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2  
The question seems to be "Where is the assembly source for puts?", not "Why is puts used instead of printf?" –  chepner Mar 19 '13 at 14:55
    
Ah, indeed you're right. I'd edit it to change the answer but that would be stealing votes from people who already answered in the comments to OP... –  Igor Skochinsky Mar 19 '13 at 15:00

answer:

use the gcc flags -fno-builtin.

Explaination:

To improve the performance, GCC, Glibc will together make some modification to the standard C library. Because GCC and Glibc works together for almost all the userspace applications, so the builtin function is turned on default, which will convert printf() function call with only one parameter with puts() function call.

You can also tell GCC not to convert a specific builtin function call by using flags like -fno-builtin-printf. Here is the complete list of the builtin functions which you can stop GCC to convert.

here is the detail explanation of the flag.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

As user unwind mentioned:

This is because your C program is expecting to be linked with the standard C runtime library, which has puts() in it. You can of course dig up the library file on your system as disassemble it, if you feel like it.

So I used objdump to disassemble libc.a and found the assembly code under the <puts> section: objdump -d /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.a

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