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I have one string

/abc/home/pqr/we21-03a

I want to convert this in the form abc_home_pqr_we21-03a

How to do it? I di some Google but got people are using regular expression. but I am not able to understand anyting. I was working in Java but just now got the work in Perl. I dont have any knowledge of perl. is there any function available here like replace() in java.

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Perl has a command similar to the tr unix tool, it is used like:

$str =~ tr|/|_|;

It means to replace first character with the second one. and pipes are separators. Take a look into perlop documentation page.

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It's output a / as first character –  sputnick Mar 19 '13 at 14:50
    
Thank You so much. –  Arun Mar 19 '13 at 14:56
    
@sputnick: You are right. It doesn't solve completely his problem, but it's a start, and this function is used as a replacement in perl. He could use s/// or substr before or after if he needs it. –  Birei Mar 19 '13 at 14:56
    
@- sputnick @Birei -I have used $str =~ tr|/|_|; and after that I have used substr $str, 1; and its giving me the desired result. I could be able to think in this direction only because of this short explanation about expressions. Thanks :) –  Arun Mar 19 '13 at 15:28

Here a more complete solution :

$ echo '/abc/home/pqr/we21-03a' |
    perl -ne '$_ = join "_", split "/"; @f = split //; print @f[1..$#f]'
abc_home_pqr_we21-03a

But basically, to replace a string, you can use s///.

Or tr/// like Birei said.

If you prefer in a script :

use strict; use warnings;

while (defined($_ = <ARGV>)) {
    $_ = join('_', split(m[/], $_, 0));
    @f = split(//, $_, 0);
    print @f[1 .. $#f];
}

You can change the default delimiter / in any regex operator, but you may explicitly type the function name when it's optional, like

/re/ # !re! is an error, match nothing, it's not match operator

for

m!re! # match operator explicetely
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I wonder the reason of the downvote –  sputnick Mar 19 '13 at 22:24

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