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I have the same question as was asked in this post, but for Ruby instead of Perl. Comparing-two-hashes-with-the-keys-and-values - Perl

I want to compare two hashes, first to see if they key which is in the 1st hash, exists in the 2nd hash and if so compare the values and print the value of the hash key else if the values are not equal, print the key which has the unequal value.

I have looked at many suggestions, but cannot find an answer for comparing values in two different hashes.

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I believe I may need to clarify as I cannot seem to get the given answers to work effectively. –  stephiepea Mar 19 '13 at 15:43
    
I have two hashes similar to this: clients = {"address"=>"street.name.1" , "name"=>"john.doe" , "age"=>25} , {"address"=>"street.name2" , "name"=>"jane.doe" , "age"=>14} , {"address"=>"street.name.3" , "name"=>"tom.smith" , "age"=>35} –  stephiepea Mar 19 '13 at 16:00
    
events = {"type"=>"party" , "participant"=>"lisa.cohen" , "date"=>"05.05.13"} , {"type"=>"corporate" , "participant"=>"john.doe" , "date"=>"26.05.13"} , {"type"=>"meeting" , "participant"=>"james.edwards" , "date"=>"14.05.13"} –  stephiepea Mar 19 '13 at 16:02
    
Therefore, if I were to compare the two to find whether any of the people are displayed in both, I would need to compare client["name"] with events["participant'] and then display those matches? –  stephiepea Mar 19 '13 at 16:03
2  
You should edit the question to add these details, rather than adding them as comments. It makes it much easier to read. –  Justin Ko Mar 19 '13 at 16:48
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To find all people displayed in both the clients and events array, I would collect the values and then compare them:

clients = {"address"=>"street.name.1" , "name"=>"john.doe" , "age"=>25} , {"address"=>"street.name2" , "name"=>"jane.doe" , "age"=>14} , {"address"=>"street.name.3" , "name"=>"tom.smith" , "age"=>35}
events = {"type"=>"party" , "participant"=>"lisa.cohen" , "date"=>"05.05.13"} , {"type"=>"corporate" , "participant"=>"john.doe" , "date"=>"26.05.13"} , {"type"=>"meeting" , "participant"=>"james.edwards" , "date"=>"14.05.13"}

#Get all client names
client_names = clients.collect{ |c| c['name'] }
p client_names
#=> ["john.doe", "jane.doe", "tom.smith"]

#Get all participant names
event_participants = events.collect{ |e| e['participant'] }
p event_participants
#=> ["lisa.cohen", "john.doe", "james.edwards"]

#Determine names that appear in both
names_in_both = client_names & event_participants
p names_in_both
#=> ["john.doe"]
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1  
Good answer. It can also be reduced to a single line: clients.map{|cl| cl['name']} & events.map{|ev| ev['participant']} –  sfstewman Mar 19 '13 at 19:10
    
Thank you both! –  stephiepea Mar 20 '13 at 10:32
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h1 = {"a" => 1, "b" => 2, "c" => 3}
h2 = {"a" => 2, "b" => 2, "d" => 3}

(h1.keys & h2.keys).each {|k| puts ( h1[k] == h2[k] ? h1[k] : k ) }

Output:

a
2
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This is the best & simplest answer. –  newUserNameHere Apr 7 at 18:33
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