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I'm working on a sudoku solver with recursive backtracking which is pretty much finished except for one thing. If I would put duplicates somewhere within the puzzle (For example 1,1 in the top corner) it can go on forever trying to find a solution even though it's not a solvable puzzle.

Any help is greatly appreciated!

Rob

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I recommend stepping through your program line by line with your debugger (or here if you're using IntelliJ). –  Zach Latta Mar 19 '13 at 15:17
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I think it should be in the solve method, not completely sure how to write it though. Perhaps another method for it? Sorry, Im quite new to Java. Perhaps someone could give you a snippet of the code. But yeah, my guess would be either in the solve method or writing a new method to checkRow and checkColumn. –  Michael Mar 19 '13 at 15:19
    
I don't understand what you mean. A Sudoku puzzle has one number in each slot, so what is it that's being duplicated? Are you talking about the solution or what a user has entered attempting a solution? Keep in mind that your readers here don't have any context except what we (might) know about Sudoku. –  arcy Mar 19 '13 at 15:25
    
@rcook Sorry, will try to clarify the explanation, check edit –  Rob Mar 19 '13 at 15:27
    
... I'm a little concerned that you're blanket catching an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException - errors of that type usually indicate a programming error of some sort (usually off-by-ones). Especially because you then return 'solved'! Figure out what's causing the error, and get rid of it. –  Clockwork-Muse Mar 19 '13 at 15:33

5 Answers 5

Well the way you know to backtrack is when your puzzle hits a contradictions, so at every step you should run a "validate" method, and if the puzzle is illegal then the last move that you made was illegal.

When you find that your move is illegal you can recursively backtrack and keep going.

Also, note that this is the rather naive approach, maybe some sudoku experts have a better algorithm, but this brute force should do the trick.

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What if square (1, 1) gets assigned the wrong value, but it works at the time. The rest of the puzzle would then attempt to solve from that point on. It would soon come to an error, where that does not correspond, even if the move it is attempting to make is correct, then fail to do so. –  user1181445 Mar 19 '13 at 15:46
    
Though I'm not really sure how I would implement such a method. –  Rob Mar 19 '13 at 15:51
    
It's not a problem at that time, but it will cause a problem down the road correct. But when it hits the problem down the road it will back track one step, and try new values. After it tries all the values and sees they all contradict it backtracks one level, and will eventually come back and fix what originally caused the contradiction. –  Cruncher Mar 19 '13 at 15:52
    
@Rob, the method is rather simple. You go through all rows, colomns and boxes, if any set has a double then you return false –  Cruncher Mar 19 '13 at 15:53
    
It's similar to the check you have actually. What I'm suggesting is to naively place numbers, and check if there's a problem afterwards. Also, this makes me curious how you ran into these problems if you never allowed duplicates in the first palce? –  Cruncher Mar 19 '13 at 15:56

You want to detect an invalid situation, so you should check for it even before calling your solver. Your solver on itself will not create invalid solutions...

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Regarding duplicates, i would suggest to keep a list of possible numbers for each cell, and when you are trying to solve a cell, you would compare this list against matching row, column and box, that way you will prevent creating duplicates. With this you can solve easier puzzles without backtracking. And if you get stuck, then use backtracking to continue...

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confirming what @pgras said... –  Basic Mar 19 '13 at 15:37
    
the problem with storing the list of "possible" values, is when do you update that list? That is, when you place numbers, you never know till the end of the puzzle whether or not that number belongs there (unless it was the only possible value) –  Cruncher Mar 19 '13 at 15:43
    
@Cruncher i didn't know that he was starting with blank puzzle. I assumed there was a given puzzle to solve. I mentioned the easier ones, those have cells with just 1 possible value. First you would init the lists, and during solving, whenever you put a number you would update all the cells in corresponding row, column and box. I implemented this and it works, but it is just first part of my sudoku solver, as it can only solve easier puzzles completely. –  Basic Mar 19 '13 at 15:54
    
@Basic It's basically just for educational purposes, I want the end user to write his/her own puzzle and occasionally there might be a human error where two numbers gets duplicated, that's what I want to prevent. –  Rob Mar 19 '13 at 16:06
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@Rob i was writing mine "for fun", because i was frustrated when i couldn't solve this one puzzle myself... :) my answer applies to your situation: when the user inputs the number you should check the corresponding row, column and box to see if it is a duplicate. If it is you can clear that cell and notify the user. You can ether keep lists as I suggested, or you can use cell coordinates to get the row, column and box that need to be checked. I prefer lists, as the code would be simpler. You would have List<ArrayList>. –  Basic Mar 19 '13 at 16:22

This isn't necessarily the answer but it should help you. I have done this sort of thing before for a macro program and it was the highest rated one available.

A Sudoku solver can be quite a challenge. The only way to tell if a move is right is if it is absolute or if it is proved later on. This can lead to be quite a challenge as the end is based off of the current situation and moves. This means that you can handle this as a permutation. You can go through each square and figure out what possible numbers it has. From there, you could get one or two defined squares. Based off of this, there are many possible ways to get to an end point.

An 'end point' would be defined when the puzzle is solved (no errors - every square filled) or there is a fault.

Based off of this, you can treat each move as a node then build a tree system surrounding the possible moves.

For example:

8 7 1   2 _ _   6 9 3
2 9 6   3 8 7   1 _ _

This is just a small example, but based off of it, respectively sweeping through each row, then each column we can generate possible numbers:

(5, 1) -> [4, 5]
(6, 1) -> [4, 5]
(8, 2) -> [4, 5]
(9, 2) -> [4, 5]

Based off of this, and the solutions given to us, we can see that there is exactly 4 possible solutions:

8 7 1   2 4 5   6 9 3
2 9 6   3 8 7   1 4 5

-or-

8 7 1   2 5 4   6 9 3
2 9 6   3 8 7   1 4 5

-or-

8 7 1   2 4 5   6 9 3
2 9 6   3 8 7   1 5 4

-or-

8 7 1   2 5 4   6 9 3
2 9 6   3 8 7   1 5 4

Though that is not enough information to solve the whole puzzle and figure out which is 'correct', this can be standardized and used to create a similar system and soon find a solution.

So you could add all 4 of these possibilities to a tree, each branching from the original:

8 7 1   2 _ _   6 9 3
2 9 6   3 8 7   1 _ _

and then deal with them recursively.

Hope this helps!

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To implement the Validate class, couldn't you just write Validate.validate(); inside of your solve method? Hope it helps.

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Already tried that but didn't work. –  Rob Mar 19 '13 at 16:56
    
Well I think the structure is correct, not sure what you should have inside the parenteses though. Perhaps someone can take a shot at this because I think it's partly right. –  Michael Mar 19 '13 at 16:59

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