Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a MongoDB collection, where I have documents with the following structure

{
   ...
   distanceDeviation: 2.0,

   loc: [
      [24.77, 67.5],
      [24.78, 67.6],
      [24.79, 67.7],
      [24.80, 67.8],
      ...
   ]
   ...
}

I have this collection geo-indexed (using ensureIndex on loc).

I want to have a query where if I send it two points Mongo returns me documents from the collection, which have both the points in their loc array.

I have been able to do it using $within with a fixed $radius parameter as follows:

{
    "$and": [
                {
                    "loc": {
                        "$within": {
                            "$center": [
                                [
                                    24.812640000000002,
                                    67.01985
                                ],
                                1.5
                            ]
                        }
                    }
                },
                {
                    "loc": {
                        "$within": {
                            "$center": [
                                [
                                    24.900070000000003,
                                    67.16828000000001
                                ],
                                1.5
                            ]
                        }
                    }
                }
            ]
}

HOWEVER, if instead of 1.5 specified as radius I want to specify that the attribute distanceDeviation is used which is a part of this document.

Is there anyway to achieve this preferably without $where. If NOT then, how can I do it with $where.

share|improve this question
    
no, there is no way to pass a variable to find() that's based on a field in the document. I don't recommend using $where for performance reason among many others - if you expand on what exactly this data represents, maybe there is a different way to structure the data (if you have that option) to get what you want with regular query? –  Asya Kamsky Mar 19 '13 at 16:17
    
There is a possibility to restructure the document. The loc variable in this document simply represents a route, and distanceDeviation represents how much flexibility is allowed for this route. I am supposed to check if another startPoint, endPoint lies within this route or not. –  Shehzad Bilal Mar 19 '13 at 16:44

1 Answer 1

There is a possibility, though a little awkward, to do the job with aggregate() and its $geoNear operator. Awkward, because aggregate allows only one $geoNear, that has to be at the top of the aggregation pipleline. So, we'd have to do two aggregates and then merge the result.

The idea: $geoNear will return the distance of a given point from each of the points in the "loc" route. We can then take the minimal distance, test with the $cond operator, whether it is within the distanceDeviation and return the documents, where this is the case.

The result is an array of documents that match for the first point. Then repeat the operation for the other point and then merge the two arrays to a list of documents that appear in both arrays.

This is how it works (for better readability, I used other coordinates)

db.xx.drop();
db.xx.insert( { distanceDeviation: 2.0, loc: [ [0,0], [10,-10], [20,10], [30,0] ] } );
db.xx.insert( { distanceDeviation: 0.1, loc: [ [0,0], [10,-10], [20,10], [30,0] ] } );
db.xx.ensureIndex({ loc: "2d" });
db.xx.find();

// points to query:
pointA = [1,1]
pointB = [21,11]

aggA = db.xx.aggregate([
    { $geoNear: { near: pointA, distanceField: "dist" } },
    { $group: { _id: { oid: "$_id", dev: "$distanceDeviation" }, min: { $min: "$dist" } } },
    { $project: { oid: "$_id.oid", isNear: { $cond: [ { $lt: [ "$min", "$_id.dev" ] }, 1, 0 ] }, _id: 0 } },
    { $match: { isNear: 1 } },
]);


aggB = db.xx.aggregate([
    { $geoNear: { near: pointB, distanceField: "dist" } },
    { $group: { _id: { oid: "$_id", dev: "$distanceDeviation" }, min: { $min: "$dist" } } },
    { $project: { oid: "$_id.oid", isNear: { $cond: [ { $lt: [ "$min", "$_id.dev" ] }, 1, 0 ] }, _id: 0 } },
    { $match: { isNear: 1 } },
]);

print("\nObjects with point near route:\n");
aggA.result.forEach( function( a ) {
    aggB.result.forEach( function( b ) {
        if ( a.oid.toString == b.oid.toString ) { print( a.oid ) };        
    });
    // Note: this can be optimised        
});

The result is:

> db.xx.find()
{ "_id" : ObjectId("5161da88ab49f42c329f4228"), "distanceDeviation" : 2, "loc" : [ [ 0, 0 ], [ 10, -10 ], [ 20, 10 ], [ 30, 0 ] ] }
{ "_id" : ObjectId("5161da88ab49f42c329f4229"), "distanceDeviation" : 0.1, "loc" : [ [ 0, 0 ], [ 10, -10 ], [ 20, 10 ], [ 30, 0 ] ] }

>> // run the aggregates

Objects with point near route:

ObjectId("5161da88ab49f42c329f4228")

Another, completely different approach would be to "draw" a closed polygon around the route at distance "distanceDeviation" and store this also in the document. This would allow to search for $within: $polygon (similar to your search within a circle) and would return a match also for points that are close to the route but not necessarily close to one of its constituent points.

Please, refer to the manual for more information on aggregate(), $geoNear and $polygon

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.