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I'm refactoring some code that runs a multi-stage process. Each step is inside a nested java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLAter.... call. It looks a little like this:

   import java.awt.EventQueue;


public class NestedInvokeLater {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                changeTabPanel();
                copySomeFiles();
                enableNextButton1();
                upDateProgressBar(10);
                java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

                    @Override
                    public void run() {
                        readInFiles();
                        doSomethingToFiles();
                        upDateProgressBar(15);
                        java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

                            @Override
                            public void run() {
                                doSomethingElse();
                                upDateProgressBar(100);

                            }
                        });
                    }
                });

            }

        });

    };
}

I am new enough at Java that I don't get the point of nesting these calls to add 'jobs' to the EDT, and I'm not 100% confident with fiddling with these calls either. I think I understand what the invokeLater call does, and what each step does. Please correct me if this understanding is wrong:

invokeLater is used to add some invocation to the list of jobs to be done in the Event Dispatch thread. Java then deals with when/how each invocation is done, ensuring that the EDT and in turn the GUI doesn't lock as it performs jobs 'in the background'.

Nesting these calls says to me that we should queue a set of jobs, one of which is to queue something, which will queue some jobs....one of which is to queue something. But the first inner invocation is only ever queued once the previous job is done. Everything occurs sequentially (this is in line of my understanding of the whole process), but I don't see why you would use nested requests to queue jobs to do so. I would have, if I was writing this from scratch, have simply created functions for each invocation and called them in turn.

I recognise, being only a novice at Java I am probably missing something huge that makes this nesting important. But there is no documentation of this, and no commenting in the code about the nesting.

What am I missing? What, if anything is the point in this code?

share|improve this question
    
Nit: There is only one EDT thread. invokeLater does not create a new thread. In this case it functions much like setTimeout(fn, 0) in JavaScript - putting the next thing to do on the queue ensures allows a UI (and progress bar percent) update before doSomethingElse starts running. Presumably soSomething and doSomethingElse take a "noticeable amount of time" (e.g 100ms to 10s). –  user166390 Mar 19 '13 at 16:22
    
Ah, ok, sorry. I got mixed up there. I'll go back and edit my question. –  Pureferret Mar 19 '13 at 16:26
    
If the code was calling the invokeAndWait method, this structure would make more sense, although the Runnables could be sequential rather than nested. This entire code block could be reduced to one Runnable. Sorta defeats the purpose of the progress bar, though. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Mar 19 '13 at 16:26
    
The EDT runs in the "foreground". Code executing on the EDT should be fast and efficient so you don't block the GUI and prevent it from repainting. If you have a long running task then you create a separate Thread which will then run in the "background". In general you don't need to nest calls with invokeLater() as all code on the EDT runs sequentially. Occassionaly some Swing internal processing may also use invokeLater() which means it will execute after your code. Therefore results may not be as expected. In this case you can nest invokeLater(). I learned this by trial and error. –  camickr Mar 19 '13 at 16:33
    
@GilbertLeBlanc this is what I am thinking, but I'm not sure/certain. It might have meant to be a nested lot of invokeAndWait calls, but I don't know if I'll ever know. –  Pureferret Mar 19 '13 at 16:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is no point in doing so many nested invocations. It is based on a good intention, but it's badly implemented.

If you want to do this properly, use a SwingWorker.

The documentation of SwingWorker has a neat example of how you should implement performing several tasks in the background of the application (the PrimeNumbersTask class showed there).

Edit: Here's an example of what you should do with SwingWorker in your case.

class SequentialInvoker extends SwingWorker<Void, Integer> {
    @Override
    public void doInBackground() {

        changeTabPanel();
        copySomeFiles();
        enableNextButton1();
        setProgress(10);

        readInFiles();
        doSomethingToFiles();
        setProgress(15);

        doSomethingElse();
        setProgress(100);
    }
}

To actually show the progress on a progress bar, take a look at the following code, copied from the SwingWorker documentation:

JTextArea textArea = new JTextArea();
JProgressBar progressBar = new JProgressBar(0, 100);
SequentialInvoker task = new SequentialInvoker();
task.addPropertyChangeListener(
    new PropertyChangeListener() {
        public  void propertyChange(PropertyChangeEvent evt) {
            if ("progress".equals(evt.getPropertyName())) {
                progressBar.setValue((Integer)evt.getNewValue());
            }
        }
    }); 

With this code, your progress bar will show the progress as the SwingWorker works.

share|improve this answer
    
This is only a small taste of the number of nested calls, I would count about 25-30. What effect does this have? Is it the same as one call, with all the methods in that call? I'm reading SwingWorker now, but it might be too much to implement that as part of my current work. –  Pureferret Mar 19 '13 at 16:33
1  
I edited to add an example with your code. –  Olivier Grégoire Mar 19 '13 at 17:39

One advantage of doing it this way is that other queued up things get to run in between. So, in between the section that does changeTabPanel() and the part that does readInFiles(), the GUI will get to respond to the user clicking on a button etc...

The actual implementation is a bit of a confusing mess and illustrates (IMHO) why anonymous functions were not such a good idea. Your inclination to make the three parts "real" functions and call them sequentially is a good one. But, to maintain the same logic, what you really need to do is make them three runnables and have each invokeLater the subsequent one.

And @Cyrille is correct that doing these major tasks on the EDT is poor practice.

share|improve this answer
    
That's someway towards what I was thinking. Making each 'subtask' it's own runnable makes a lot of sense to me. –  Pureferret Mar 19 '13 at 16:36
1  
If it were just a few subtasks, I'd say go for it. When it is 30 nested calls you probably want a SwingWorker as @ogregoire suggested, or even some full-blown Workflow system, Executor queue thingamagig etc... –  user949300 Mar 19 '13 at 23:59

There are three jobs that are used in invokeLater here. Each one does a costly thing, call updateProgressBar and then adds the next job to the EDT.

The thing is, if the code just continued to the next costly thing instead of calling invokeLater to do it, the EDT would not have the chance to repaint the progress bar to show the new value of it. This is probably why the work is broken in three invokelater calls.

Now, this is not what I would call a good code. This is pretty bad practice: one should not do a long process in the EDT because it blocks everything and makes the GUI unresponsive. This should be changed so that the process is done in a separate thread, and then only call invokeLater to update the progress bar.

Edit: To answer more generally the question in the title: there is almost never a sensible reason to nest calls to invokeLater. When you are doing this, you say "queue this job so that it is done in the same thread but later when you feel it would be good". So it gives a chance to the rest of the GUI to repaint itself, like here. But it only makes sense if you have a long running process in the EDT, which you should always avoid.

share|improve this answer
    
It might help to know that the 'real' program disables all the buttons so the user cannot so anything with the GUI anyway. –  Pureferret Mar 19 '13 at 16:38
    
Oh my. This is quite bad too. Should use modal dialog instead with the progress bar inside. –  Cyrille Ka Mar 19 '13 at 16:39
    
Basically a pop-up? –  Pureferret Mar 19 '13 at 16:40
1  
yeah, but "modal", so it blocks access to the GUI below. –  Cyrille Ka Mar 19 '13 at 16:42

The code you posted makes absolutely no sense to me - you can just write everything sequentially because you have no parallel threads running which might post events on the EDT. You need the first invokeLater() though, as you use Swing components.

But as your code suggests you are doing some relatively lengthy operations: reading files, do something with them, ... You should run these methods in a new worker thread, NOT the EDT. And, in the run() method of these worker threads, you'll need a call to EventQueue.invokeLater() to have your GUI updated.

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